MCAT Test Centers in California

By | February 26, 2019

According to AAMC (the MCAT test maker), there are 22 MCAT test centers in California. Most testing centers are located inside a college or university. You can select a testing location that is nearest to you. Please note that you are able to choose a test center when registering for the MCAT.

MCAT Test Centers in California

Orange County – Anaheim
1290 N. HANCOCK STREET
SUITE250
ANAHEIM, CA 92807

San Francisco – Alameda
1411 Harbor Bay Pkwy
Suite 1001
Alameda, CA 94502

Los Angeles – Culver City
5601 WEST SLAUSON AVE
SUITE 110
CULVER CITY, CA 90230

Ventura – Camarillo
501 Mobil Ave
Suite D
Camarillo, CA 93010

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY
400 W 1st Street, Room 420
Testing and CBT Office, Student Service Cent
California State University
Chico, CA 95929

Los Angeles – Culver City
5601 WEST SLAUSON AVENUE
SUITE 110 (Los Angeles – Metro Area)
Culver City, CA 90230

Los Angeles – Diamond Bar
1241 SOUTH GRAND AVENUE
SUNSET VILLAGE SHOP CTR/Suite F
DIAMOND BAR, CA 91765

Sacramento – Fair Oaks
5330 Primrose Drive
Suite # 200
FAIR OAKS, CA 95628

Fresno – East Barstow
125 EAST BARSTOW
SUITE 136
FRESNO, CA 93710

Los Angeles – Gardena
1045 W. REDONDO BEACH BLVD
CO-LOCATED W/ SYLVAN LEARNING CTR
GARDENA, CA 90247

Los Angeles – Glendale
701 NORTH BRAND BLVD
SUITE 210
GLENDALE, CA 91203

Orange County – Lake Forest
24551 RAYMOND WAY
SUITE 180
LAKE FOREST, CA 92630

San Bernardino – Rancho Cucamonga
7365 CARNELIAN ST, STE 107
CO-LOCATED W/ SYLVAN LEARNING CTR
RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CA 91730

San Bernardino – Rancho Cucamonga
7365 Carnelian St.
Suite 107
Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730

San Diego – Shoreman Place
5075 SHOREHAM PLACE
SUITE 180
SAN DIEGO, CA 92122

ETS – San Diego State University
5500 Campanile Drive
STUDENT SERVICES BLDG., RM 2549
SAN DIEGO, CA 92182-7449

San Francisco – Kearney Street
222 KEARNY ST.
SUITE 603
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94108

San Francisco – California Street
100 CALIFORNIA ST
STE #105
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94111

San Jose – Moorpark Avenue
4030 MOORPARK AVE
SUITE 280
SAN JOSE, CA 95117-4103

ETS – CAL POLY. STATE UNIV.
South Perimeter Road
California Polytechnic State Bldg 124, Rm 121
SAN LUIS OBISPO, CA 93407

Santa Rosa – Guerneville Road
1421 Guerneville Road
Suite # 112
SANTA ROSA, CA 95403

San Francisco – San Bruno
801 Traeger Ave
SUITE 140
San Bruno, CA 94066

Medical College Admission Test in California

Russian California

In the second half of the 18th and early 19th centuries, America was actively explored by Russian pioneers and merchants. In 1799, the Russian-American Company was created for the development of Alaska, in 1806, one of its founders, Nikolai Rezanov, on the ships “Juno” and “Avos” organized an expedition to California. Rezanov’s goal was to reach agreements with the Spaniards on the supply of food to Russian settlements in Alaska.

The Spaniards at that time were allies of Napoleon, and Rezanov’s mission could have ended in failure if a romantic relationship had not arisen between the Russian diplomat and the daughter of the commandant of the Spanish fortress in San Francisco, Concepción (Conchita) Arguello. Nikolai and Conchita became engaged, and “Juno” and “Avos” went to Alaska, loaded with food. Rezanov described to Alexander Andreevich Baranov, who was then in charge of the Russian-American Company, the fertile lands of California and strongly recommended that they be actively developed.

Nikolai Rezanov died a year later, having failed to carry out his plans for the colonization of America. The love story of Rezanov and Conchita Argüello served as the basis for the creation of the ballad of the American writer Francis Bret Hart “Concepción de Argüello”, the poem by Andrei Voznesensky “Avos” and other literary and musical works.

Alexander Baranov supported Rezanov’s idea of ​​creating a Russian settlement in California. In 1808, he organized an expedition led by Ivan Kuskov, whose task was to assert Russian claims to the lands of Northern California. Kuskov not only buried metal plates on the coast of Bodega Bay (then Kuskov named it in honor of the Minister of Trade of the Russian Empire Rumyantsev Bay), indicating the rights of ownership, but also returned to Alaska with more than a thousand precious skins of the sea beaver-sea otter, the main one at that time the subject of interest of Russian merchants in America.

In 1811, Ivan Kuskov returned to California, choosing to establish a settlement on a convenient plateau eighty kilometers north of San Francisco, next to the river, which he named the Slavyanka (today it is the Russian River, “Russian River”). Kuskov bought the land from the Kashaya Pomo Indians for clothes and household equipment and laid here in 1812 a fortified outpost, called Fort Ross.

Fort Ross was created as an agricultural base for Russian settlements in Alaska. Cattle, horses and sheep were bred here, wheat, vegetables and fruits (including peaches and grapes) were grown. Fort Ross craftsmen made barrels, furniture and carts, and ships were built at the shipyard (a few were even sold to the Spaniards). Three separate estates were built in the vicinity of the fort.

The population of Fort Ross exceeded two hundred and fifty people, Russians, Yakuts, Aleuts, and Indians lived here. The Indians were actively involved in the work in the fort, both for payment in food and forcibly. However, during the entire existence of the Russian settlement in California, there was not a single armed conflict between the settlers and the natives.

By the thirties of the 19th century, the population of sea otters in the settlement area had sharply decreased, and by that time the British Hudson’s Bay Company was supplying food from Canada to Alaska. Fort Ross, with its uncertain international status, became unprofitable and the Russian-American Company decided to sell it. In 1841, Fort Ross was sold to John Sutter, who founded the New Helvetia (New Switzerland) settlement in California, which grew into the modern city of Sacramento.

Now Fort Ross, which has the status of a State Historic Park, is one of the popular tourist attractions in California; about one hundred and fifty thousand people visit it annually.