Malta During World War II

By | December 26, 2021

According to an assessment of December 31, 1946, the population rises to 295,247 residents Official languages ​​are English and Maltese, the latter introduced in 1934 to replace the Italian one. The constitution of 1939 had deprived the island of all autonomy. But the admiration aroused in England by the value and the spirit of sacrifice shown by the population (on April 17, 1942 the island was awarded the George Cross, created to reward resistance to air attacks during the Second World War), which in the meantime demanded unanimously a new constitutional order led the English government to the declaration of 13 July 1943 to the Municipalities, with which it committed itself to re-establish an autonomous government at the end of the war. On February 10, 1944, a congress met, charged with preparing the convocation of a constituent assembly, which held the first session on January 20, 1945. It, with the assistance of a British commissioner (Sir Harold Mac Michael) finally agreed in the summer of 1946 and so, with patent letters dated 5 September 1947, in force since 22, the island – which since July 1946 had been given as governor a civilian (FRC Douglas) rather than, as was tradition, a military man – had its new constitution. It establishes a legislative assembly of 40 members elected by universal suffrage and with proportional representation (elected on 23 October 1947, it opened on 1 November, in the presence of the Duke of Gloucester); a cabinet made up of the prime minister and a maximum of 7 other members. Matters relating to defense and relations with the the foreign governor, assisted by a council (Nominated Council), composed of the deputy governor, the legal secretary and 3 officers representing the armed forces: this, together with the cabinet (Executive Council), constitutes the private council ( Privy Council). The post-war economic problems were extremely serious, so that the concession of 10 million pounds at the end of 1942 had to be added (February 1946) another 20 million; in addition, the Malta Reconstruction Act provides that the island can benefit from funds as a colony. constitutes the private council (Privy Council). The post-war economic problems were extremely serious, so that the concession of 10 million pounds at the end of 1942 had to be added (February 1946) another 20 million; in addition, the Malta Reconstruction Act provides that the island can benefit from funds as a colony. constitutes the private council (Privy Council). The post-war economic problems were extremely serious, so that the concession of 10 million pounds at the end of 1942 had to be added (February 1946) another 20 million; in addition, the Malta Reconstruction Act provides that the island can benefit from funds as a colony. For Malta 1999, please check estatelearning.com.

War damage. – Extensive is the damage caused by the repeated and violent aerial bombardments to the artistic monuments of Malta. In the towns of Senglea and La Vittoriosa, almost completely destroyed, the churches of S. Filippo, S. Giuliano and S. Anna (XVII century) were saved in the first and in the second, the Castle of S. Angelo, also hit by bombs, and the churches of the Carmelites (1611) and of S. Scolastica (17th century). The destruction in Valletta was also serious. The monastery of S. Orsola, founded in 1583, the churches of S. Maria di Damasco (1576), and S. Niccolò (1762), the Albergo della Lingua di Francia, the Hompesch and St. Poix palaces were demolished. (XVIII century). The churches of Nostra Signora di Liesse and the Salvatore (XVIII century) have suffered serious damage; the palace of the Grand Master, the Hotels of the Language of Castile, of the Language of Italy, of the Auvergne language, the Upper Baracca, the Hospital of the Order, the fish market (17th century), the Parisio palace (18th century), which has been restored, and the house Dorell (16th century). The churches of the Carmelites (1573), of the Augustinians, of Nostra Signora del Pilar (1670), of S. Giacomo and S. Maria Maddalena, the palace of the Treasury of the Order (today the Casino Maltese) and the Bookshop. In the church of S. Giovanni the chapel of the Language of Italy was hit, while the Franciscan church lost its cloister. Considerable destruction and damage are also to be complained of Attard, Cospicua, Floriana, Gzira, Kalkara, Luca, Mosta and Micabba. Order, the fish market (17th century), the Parisio palace (18th century), which has been restored, and the Dorell house (16th century). The churches of the Carmelites (1573), of the Augustinians, of Nostra Signora del Pilar (1670), of S. Giacomo and S. Maria Maddalena, the palace of the Treasury of the Order (today the Casino Maltese) and the Bookshop. In the church of S. Giovanni the chapel of the Language of Italy was hit, while the Franciscan church lost its cloister. Considerable destruction and damage are also to be complained of Attard, Cospicua, Floriana, Gzira, Kalkara, Luca, Mosta and Micabba. Order, the fish market (17th century), the Parisio palace (18th century), which has been restored, and the Dorell house (16th century). The churches of the Carmelites (1573), of the Augustinians, of Nostra Signora del Pilar (1670), of S. Giacomo and S. Maria Maddalena, the palace of the Treasury of the Order (today the Casino Maltese) and the Bookshop. In the church of S. Giovanni the chapel of the Language of Italy was hit, while the Franciscan church lost its cloister. Considerable destruction and damage are also to be complained of Attard, Cospicua, Floriana, Gzira, Kalkara, Luca, Mosta and Micabba. the churches of the Carmelites (1573), of the Augustinians, of Nostra Signora del Pilar (1670), of S. Giacomo and S. Maria Maddalena, the palace of the Treasury of the Order (today the Casino Maltese) and the Library. In the church of S. Giovanni the chapel of the Language of Italy was hit, while the Franciscan church lost its cloister. Considerable destruction and damage are also to be complained of Attard, Cospicua, Floriana, Gzira, Kalkara, Luca, Mosta and Micabba. the churches of the Carmelites (1573), of the Augustinians, of Nostra Signora del Pilar (1670), of S. Giacomo and of S. Maria Maddalena, the palace of the Treasury of the Order (today the Casino Maltese) and the Library. In the church of S. Giovanni the chapel of the Language of Italy was hit, while the Franciscan church lost its cloister. Considerable destruction and damage are also to be complained of Attard, Cospicua, Floriana, Gzira, Kalkara, Luca, Mosta and Micabba.

Malta During World War II