Kenya Education

Kenya Education

Luxury good education

Director Edward Ndeda in the overcrowded exam class Kongowea Primary School, Mombasa

Director Edward Ndeda in the overcrowded exam class Kongowea Primary School, Mombasa

As a major country in African continent according to petwithsupplies, Kenya has achieved a lot in the field of education. According to the World Bank, around 80 percent of Kenyans can read and write for over 15 years. A good education is considered to be the key to social advancement, to a higher productivity of the economy and a lower dependence of the individual and the national economy on the volatile agricultural sector. Kenya’s parents know that too, but with more than 9 million primary schoolchildren, the public education system is hopelessly overloaded. Although free since 2003, parents who can even begin to afford it take their children out of the public system and put them in private schools which, depending on the image and offer, are not necessarily cheap despite competition. Social, regional and ethnic affiliations have an impact on the educational success and future prospects of children.

Schools

The education system works on the 8-4-4 principle, which means that after eight years of primary school there is a national exam, after which only a fraction of the children can attend higher schools. The good performance is of such importance for the reputation of the private schools that some students who are gifted by the public institutes literally poach them before the exams in order to advertise their successes. There is also regular fraud in the exams. From the numerous boarding schools, there have been isolated reports to the public about the sexual abuse of girls by teachers who have been entrusted with them. The structural condition is one of the risks for the student body the school building, or the fact that children die in locked boarding halls when fires break out.

The poor pay of the teachers already led to recurring. A school year at a private boarding school is available for the equivalent of 500 euros, including food. This is tightly calculated even for Kenyan standards and does not indicate lavish teacher salaries.

Colleges

Kenya’s state and private universities are unable to train enough young academics. Those who have money send their children overseas, from India to Canada, depending on their income. The largest university in the country is the University of Nairobi, which is often the starting point for protest marches due to its location on the edge of downtown Nairobi. Due to lack of funds, some students have to interrupt or drop out of their training. Strikes and closings also mean long study times. The DAAD provides current insights into Kenyan higher education. The exchange is not a one-way street. In Nairobi you will also meet students from Germany who are acquiring their basic physics there, or German doctors doing internships who expect more insights into the spectrum of emergency medicine from clinics in Nairobi than in Germany.

Craft

There are institutes for handicrafts that offer practical courses, such as the Utali College for the hotel and catering sector. But most craftsmen have to get by without specialist training; good skilled workers such as plumbers, electricians or auto mechanics are therefore difficult to find. The German Development Ministry launched a major initiative to combat the lack of vocational training in 2017, and in 2018 the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) also presented a study on ways to implement the German vocational training system in Kenya.

Kenya’s education sector has long enjoyed special support from the donor community, but the large budget also makes the education budget vulnerable to corruption, which is why Great Britain temporarily froze its millions in aid.

Reading, writing, arithmetic

Reading, writing, arithmetic

The direct line: private German aid organizations

Fun in the brass band

Fun in the brass band

You want to give something back after happy years in Kenya. Or they are shocked that there is so much poverty in a country that they first got to know as a holiday paradise and then a little better. In any case, many Germans maintain private relationships in Kenya and also run aid projects – mostly in the field of child and youth protection, on a voluntary basis and completely independent of government or professional development cooperation. Whether children’s homes, schools or educational support – the projects are usually tied to a location or a topic.

For example, the former ARD radio correspondent Wim Dohrenbusch thinks that something urgently needs to be done in terms of professional qualifications. That is why he founded Apamoyo eV to enable young people to learn a trade – in such a way that they later make a living from it and actually can do something. That’s why Dohrenbusch and his colleagues want

  • Find talent
  • Provide jump start
  • Promote initiative
  • Develop responsibility

and hit a nerve. Vocational training has recently become one of the official priorities of German development aid, as outlined in Gerd Müller’s Marshall Plan.

TV presenter Frank Plasberg supports Shangilia

TV presenter Frank Plasberg supports Shangilia

However, the private non-governmental organizations have little contact with the official donors. A primary school teacher from Limburg has built a school in Ukunda on the south coast; a couple connected to Kenya run a small children’s charity that looks after slum children in Kisumu in Nyanza. A family from Cologne lost their heart to the country after a professional stay in Kenya and is now supporting a large children’s home in one of the slums in Nairobi – a project that was started more than 20 years ago by the Germans Anja Faber and the correspondents Dreckmann the baptism was carried out.

It is difficult to understand what ex-expats transfer to former domestic workers, relatives and friends in Kenya outside of an organized framework: school fees, pension subsidies, a financial injection in the crisis – which is unfortunately not tax-deductible in this form in Germany – it should total millions Euros that flow into Kenya every year in this way.

Some of the private NGOs mobilize celebrities for a good cause, other friends, relatives and colleagues. Her goal is always to help people in Kenya effectively, regardless of the theoretical discussion about the sense or nonsense of development aid. The list given here is just a beginning – it would probably make sense in the meantime for all of the private initiatives to network, on the one hand to exchange experiences, on the other hand also to have a different standing in relation to official bodies in Kenya. However, the author cannot guarantee the quality of the work done by the organizations mentioned in Kenya.

Vocational training under corrugated iron roofs

Vocational training under corrugated iron roofs