Israel Foreign Policy

By | December 22, 2021

Israeli foreign policy, since 1948, declares itself intended for world peace, the peaceful settlement of relations with Arab neighbors, respect for human rights, freedom of relations with the various Jewish communities in the world. Israel has generally aligned itself with the majority of democratic nations, but seeking to implement an independent so-called “non-identification” policy. Very close relations have been maintained with the USA, which, especially during the Truman administration, helped Israel with grants, loans and technical assistance. Friendly relations are maintained with Western Europe and the Commonwealth, while diplomatic relations with the USSR, already good, were broken from 11 February 1953 to 21 July 1953, on the question of Jewish doctors tried by the Soviet government. Following a trip by the Israeli Minister of Foreign Affairs in 1953, relations with the countries of South America have developed. On the other hand, relations with Asian countries are scarce. The Holy See and Spain have not recognized the state of Israel. Particular relations have been had with West Germany: on January 16, 1951 the government of Israel he handed over an identical note to the four occupying Powers of Germany asking that Germany be obliged to liquidate to the state of Israel the compensation owed to the Jews or their heirs for the damage caused to them by Hitler Germany, which were specified, with another note dated 12 March 1951, in over 6 million deaths and over 6 billion dollars in deprivation. On December 5, 1951, Chancellor Adenauer declared his willingness to negotiate. The negotiations, which began in January 1952, led to the conclusion of an agreement, signed on September 10, in Luxembourg, under which Germany undertook to pay $ 100 million to Israel. Despite the threat from the Arab states to boycott German products, the treaty was ratified on March 20, 1953 by the Bundestag. Relations with the Arab states, even after the aforementioned armistice agreements, remained very tense. In 1951 Israel submitted to the Security Council the question of Egypt’s interference with the movement of ships to and from Israel and, on 1 September, the Security Council decided that the warring parties, by virtue of the armistice, they could not exercise the right of visit or search or confiscation and he declared himself against the restrictions imposed by Egypt on navigation on the Canal to the detriment of Israel. Not having the Egyptian government complied with the UN invitation, on January 27, 1954 Israel asked the Security Council to condemn Egypt for the violation of the Council resolution of 1951 and for the violation of the armistice and the norms of international law. The border incidents continue, so much so that Israel, having determined the Anglo-Franco-Egyptian tension over the Suez Canal, on 29 October 1956 proceeded to the military occupation of the Sinai peninsula up to the Canal, occupation (v.Suez,. in this App.) which was not maintained, having obtained the freedom of navigation for ships in the Gulf of ‛Aqaba and the safety of the source in the territory of Gaza, subject to international control. Subsequently, in December 1958, the UN Secretary General attempted a rapprochement between the government of Israel and the RAU, but the incidents continued, as did the protests to the UN, by Israel, both for the seizure of the Israeli cargo of ships crossing the Suez Canal, and for the violation, by the Egyptian side, of the convention of 1888 On the canal. For Israel 2011, please check internetsailors.com.

With Jordan, after the armistice, there is an almost continuous state of guerrilla warfare that neither the Security Council nor the Joint Armistice Commission have been able to quell. A serious dispute has been going on with Syria since 1953 over the canal, designed by Israel, from the Jordan to the Sea of ​​Galilee. Opposing the Syrian government, the matter was brought to the Security Council; but following the veto imposed by the USSR the question remained unsolved and the works were suspended. Relations with Syria have always remained tense and on November 3, 1954 Faris al-Khoury solemnly declared to parliament that it is the duty of the Arab peoples to prepare to resume the war against Israel.

Israel Foreign Policy