Iran Cinematography Part IV

By | December 16, 2021

The flare-up of the popular uprising against the shāh regime and the 1979 revolution, which led to the Iran to become an Islamic Republic led by āyatollāh Khomeyni, they also had repercussions on cinema, which saw production prospects and artistic freedoms change due to the repression exercised by the censorship bodies imposed by the new regime. In this climate, if some directors of the nouvelle vague preferred to leave the country (F. Ghaffari, E. Golestan, P. Kimiavi, later also A. Naderi), others found a way to adapt to the changed conditions, giving life – especially from the late eighties, when the production structure was consolidated again – to a new season of Iranian cinema, proliferating of works and authors always able to impose themselves on the In fact, having overcome a first phase, marked by the rejection of the Western world, in which authors and works adhering to post-revolutionary dictates imposed themselves (while censorship unlocked and released films made before 1979 on the market), Iranian cinema found a productive and expressive formula that was able to regenerate both its industrial structure and its authors. A certain equilibrium was re-established in international relations in the 1990s, thanks to the moderately reforming policy of the new president Ali Rafsanjani, elected in 1989, and the death of Khomeyni, Iran he knew how to make his cinema a bridge to the western world. Between the eighties and nineties a group of authors established themselves internationally and won prizes in all the main festivals, so much so as to constitute an authentic cultural case for a West increasingly fascinated by a series of works suspended between metaphorical realism and metaphysical lyricism. Among these authors he proved to be particularly representative Mohsen Makhmalbaf, a prestigious figure abroad as much as loved by the public at home. Full expression of post-revolutionary culture, this director has been able to modulate his cinema on increasingly rigorous solutions, ranging from the metaphorical roar of his first successes – Dastforush (1986; L’ambulante) and Baysikelran (1988; The cyclist) – to the aesthetic rarefaction of his latest, most ambitious works: Gabbe (1995), Nun va goldun (1995; Bread and flower), Sokout (1998; Silence), Safar-e Qandahār (2001; Journey to Kandahar). Makhmalbaf founded, in the nineties, a film school which is also a production company, aimed at guaranteeing independence to the authors who work there. In this context, the director’s daughter, Samira Makhmalbaf made her debut, who, after Sib (1998; La mela), this author has shown that she knows how to combine humor and drama, letting it emerge in the absurd tones of the events that an intelligent analysis of power relations tells. Always careful to grasp the human dynamics taking place in suburban backgrounds, Bani-Etemad has created her masterpiece with Nargess (1992, Narciso), a daring melodrama that tells a love triangle between a thief, a fatal woman and an honest young woman. For Iran 1999, please check estatelearning.com.

He then confirmed the high level of his inspiration with Zir-e pust-e shahr (2001, Under the skin of the city), an intertwining between dreams of escape abroad and the need for resignation in the heart of a Tehran family. directors who have established themselves in the nineties of particular importance Jafar Panahi who, in addition to a series of short films, has made three films received with interest by international critics and awarded at festivals: Bādkonak-e sefid (1995; The white balloon), Ayne (1997, The mirror), Dāyere (2000; The circle), winner of the Golden Lion for Venice Film Festival, and Babak Payami, who, returning to Tehran after studying in Canada, made his successful debut in 1998 with Yek ruz bishtar (2000, One day more) – story of a secret love told crossing the city streets – and he obtained recognition in Venice with the subsequent Rāy-e makhfi (2001; Il voto is secret), set in a remote area of ​​the Iran on election day, following the path of an employee who collects ballot papers. The circle), winner of the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival, and Babak Payami, who, returning to Tehran after studying in Canada, made his successful debut in 1998 with Yek ruz bishtar (2000, One more day) – story of a secret love told by crossing the city streets – and obtained recognition in Venice with the subsequent Rāy-e makhfi (2001; The vote is secret), set in a remote area of ​​the Iran on election day, following the path of an employee who collects ballot papers. The circle), winner of the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival, and Babak Payami, who, returning to Tehran after studying in Canada, made his successful debut in 1998 with Yek ruz bishtar (2000, One more day) – story of a secret love told by crossing the city streets – and obtained recognition in Venice with the subsequent Rāy-e makhfi (2001; The vote is secret), set in a remote area of ​​the Iran on election day, following the path of an employee who collects ballot papers.

Iran Cinematography Part IV