IELTS Test Centers in Zambia

By | July 22, 2020

IELTS Testing Centres in Zambia

In total, there are 2 test locations in Zambia that offer IELTS exams. You can select the one which is closer to you.

There are two types of test format available for IELTS exams: paper-based or computer-delivered. For both formats, the Speaking Section is done with a real IELTS examiner on a face-to-face basis.

Lusaka, Zambia

British Council

Street Address: Mulungushi International Conference Centre, Great East Road, Lusaka

Telephone Number: +260211376700

Contact Email: [email protected]

Website URL: https://www.britishcouncil.org.zm/exam/ielts

Kitwe, Zambia

British Council

Street Address: Lechwe School, Plot Number 1384, Namwala Avenue, Parklands, Kitwe

Contact Email: [email protected]

Website URL: https://www.britishcouncil.org.zm/exam/ielts

List of cities in Zambia where you can take the IELTS tests

  • Kitwe
  • Lusaka

More about Zambia

  • COUNTRYVV: Overview of labor market in Zambia, including latest unemployment rate and youth unemployment. Also covers job distribution by economic sectors, such as public sector, finance and hotels and restaurants.

IELTS Test Centers in Zambia

Population

Thanks to the favorable environmental conditions, the territory of Zambia has attracted man since the most remote times. In the Upper Paleolithic it was the background of developed civilizations of hunters, testified among other things by the finds of Broken Hill (today Kabwe); in the Mesolithic it hosted tribes of Bushmen and Hottentots, who still in not distant times inhabited the southwestern highlands, suitable for their pastoral activities. Ancient Aboriginal peoples are also pigmoidi twa (batwa or batua) settled at Bangweulu Lake. In historical times the major invasions that contributed to determining the anthropic characteristics of the region had as protagonists, starting from the century. XII, the Tonga (batonga), who settled in the regions located to the N of the middle course of the Zambezi, and numerous other Bantu groups, some, such as the bemba (babemba), coming from the Congolese region, others, with Cafre components, from E and from S following the ethnic displacements of southern Africa, especially aroused by the expansion of the Zulu empire of Ciaka (beginning of the 19th century). All these invaders, including particular political importance, had the rotse (barotse), settled in southwestern Zambia, overlapped and replaced the Bushmen and Hottentots, pushing them back and confining them permanently to the most inhospitable areas of the Kalahari. Basically the population of Zambia, formed from this complex amalgam, has a fairly homogeneous background as regards cultural heritage and traditional activities; in any case approx. about eighty tribes. The most numerous groups are the bemba (33.6%), the nyanja (18.2%), the tonga (16.8%), the barotse (7.8%), the tumbuka (5.1%), the mambwe (5.9%); the others are 12.6%. Whites (Europeans and South Africans) began to settle in Zambia at the beginning of the twentieth century, but immigration became consistent only in the thirties. There are also minorities of Indians, coloureds (mestizos), also generally urbanized. Zambia has always been one of the least populated countries in all of Africa; in 1950 it did not yet reach 2 million residents, but in recent years, thanks to improved sanitation conditions and the sharp reduction in mortality, the annual demographic increase has settled at around 1.5% (2002 -2007) and the population has now exceeded 10 million residents. The average density, however, remains around rather low values ​​ (16 residents/km²); only in the Copperbelt province are there strong concentrations. In the form of a rural settlement, the most widespread traditional village is the one dominated by the kraal; in 2008, however, only 35% of the population lived in cities. Lusaka, the capital, is the major center, privileged by its central position also towards the south-western and north-eastern sections of the country. Typical European creation also in the urban aspects, it hosts the majority of the white population residing in Zambia. It owes its great expansion to its strategic position in relation to the country’s road communications: it is here that the Great North Road (which reaches Tanzania) and the Great East Road (which connects Zambia to Malawi) meet. Other important cities are Ndola, a point of convergence and redistribution of all the products of the Copperbelt, Kabwe, Kitwe and Chingola, mining centers where large industries are located, and Maramba (Livingstone), mainly a tourist center, near the Victoria Falls. Check baglib to see Zambia Natural Attractions.