IELTS Test Centers in Uruguay

By | July 22, 2020

IELTS Testing Centres in Uruguay

In total, there are 2 test locations in Uruguay that offer IELTS exams. You can select the one which is closer to you.

There are two types of test format available for IELTS exams: paper-based or computer-delivered. For both formats, the Speaking Section is done with a real IELTS examiner on a face-to-face basis.

Montevideo, Montevideo Department, Uruguay

International House – Montevideo

Street Address: Av. Brasil 2831, Montevideo, Montevideo, Uruguay

Telephone Number: +54 11 4313-8255

Contact Email: [email protected]

Website URL: www.ielts.org.ar

Montevideo, Montevideo Department, Uruguay

British Council – Instituto Cultural Anglo-Uruguayo

Street Address: Registration address San José 1426

Telephone Number: +598 29023773

Contact Email: [email protected]

Website URL: http://www.anglo.edu.uy

List of cities in Uruguay where you can take the IELTS tests

  • Montevideo

More about Uruguay

  • COUNTRYVV: Overview of labor market in Uruguay, including latest unemployment rate and youth unemployment. Also covers job distribution by economic sectors, such as public sector, finance and hotels and restaurants.

IELTS Test Centers in Uruguay

History

The victory of the center-left alliance Encuentro Progresista-Frente Amplio / Nueva Mayoría (EP-FA / NM) with the presidential candidate T. R. Vázquez Rosas in the 2004 elections brought an historic turnaround, ending the 170-year hegemony of traditional parties. With Vázquez’s election victory (taking office on March 1, 2005), a trend towards left-wing governments that can be observed in numerous South American countries continued. Following his example, the Brazilian President Lula da Silva, followed Vázquez a moderate, market economy-oriented economic policy. Social policy, neglected by previous governments, also had priority for him. In terms of foreign policy, Uruguay resumed relations with Cuba and concluded an investment agreement with the USA. At the same time, the intention to sign a free trade agreement with the US created tensions within Mercosur. The Vázquez government also worked hard to come to terms with the time of the military dictatorship. In December 2007, the trial of the former ruler Gregorio Álvarez Armellino, who was charged with crimes against humanity (kidnapping opposition members), was charged (2009 sentenced to 25 years in prison). Check healthvv to see South America Overview.

The 2009 presidential elections were won on November 29th in the second round of voting by former guerrilla fighter J. A. Mujica Cordano who announced after the election that he wanted to continue the moderate, reform-oriented policies of his predecessor (took office on March 1, 2010). In the parliamentary elections on October 25, 2009, the left-wing alliance Frente Amplio defended an absolute majority in the House of Representatives by winning 50 of the 99 seats. In terms of foreign and economic policy, the new government concentrated on developing and strengthening relations with the Member States of Mercosur. In 2011, a dispute over the repeal of the amnesty law of 1986 sparked fierce domestic political debates. After the Senate passed the repeal of the law with a narrow majority in mid-April 2011, the Chamber of Deputies was unable to agree on a reinterpretation a month later. As a result, tens of thousands of demonstrators in Montevideo called for the law to be repealed. In October 2011, 50 out of 90 MPs finally voted for repeal in order to be able to punish crimes committed by the military dictatorship between 1973 and 1985 in Uruguay. In 2012, abortions were legalized under certain conditions. In February 2013, the country’s Supreme Court overturned the 2011 law that prevented the statute of limitations on human rights crimes dating from the time of the military dictatorship. On December 10, 2013, Uruguay was the first country in the world to legalize the cultivation and sale of cannabis under state supervision. In February 2013, the country’s Supreme Court overturned the 2011 law that prevented the statute of limitations on human rights crimes dating from the time of the military dictatorship. On December 10, 2013, Uruguay was the first country in the world to legalize the cultivation and sale of cannabis under state supervision. In February 2013, the country’s Supreme Court overturned the 2011 law that prevented the statute of limitations on human rights crimes dating from the time of the military dictatorship. On December 10, 2013, Uruguay was the first country in the world to legalize the cultivation and sale of cannabis under state supervision.

Parliamentary and presidential elections were held on October 26, 2014. The left-wing alliance Frente Amplio again won 50 of the 99 seats in the House of Representatives. The Partido Nacional had 32 seats. In the presidential elections none of the candidates achieved the required absolute majority. The casting vote on November 30, 2014 was won by the former president T. R. Vázquez Rosas as candidate of Frente Amplio with 53.6% of the votes. His opponent Luis Lacalle Pou (* 1973), candidate of the Partido Nacional and son of the former president Luis Alberto Lacalle Herrera, got 43.4%. T. R. Vázquez Rosas was sworn in on March 1st, 2015 in the presidency.

In the parliamentary elections on October 27, 2019, after fifteen years with left-wing governments, there was a political change to a coalition of the right led by L. Lacalle from the conservative Partido Nacional. He prevailed against the left-wing candidate Daniel Martínez (* 1957) in the runoff election for president on November 24, 2019. Supports will Lacalle is by tradition the party Colorado and the new far-right group Cabildo Abierto. The latter is under the leadership of the former General Guido Manini (* 1958).