IELTS Test Centers in South Africa

By | July 22, 2020

IELTS Testing Centres in South Africa

In total, there are 5 test locations in South Africa that offer IELTS exams. You can select the one which is closer to you.

There are two types of test format available for IELTS exams: paper-based or computer-delivered. For both formats, the Speaking Section is done with a real IELTS examiner on a face-to-face basis.

Durban, South Africa

British Council Durban

Street Address: Richfield Graduate Institute of Technology 9 Palm Blvd Umhlanga, Umhlanga, Durban, KwaZulu Natal

Telephone Number: +27 11 560 9300

Contact Email: [email protected]

Website URL: http://www.britishcouncil.org.za/exam/ielts

Port Elizabeth, South Africa

British Council Port Elizabeth

Street Address: B and E Conference Centre, Port Elizabeth

Telephone Number: +27 11 560 9300

Contact Email: [email protected]

Website URL: http://www.britishcouncil.org.za/exam/ielts

Johannesburg, South Africa

British Council test location – Johannesburg

Street Address: 275 Jan Smuts Avenue, Johannesburg

Telephone Number: +27 11 560 9300

Contact Email: [email protected]

Website URL: http://www.britishcouncil.org.za/exam/ielts

Pretoria, South Africa

British Council – Pretoria

Street Address: 203 Soutter Street, Entrance G2, Pretoria

Telephone Number: +27 11 560 9300

Contact Email: [email protected]

Website URL: http://www.britishcouncil.org.za/exam/ielts

Cape Town, South Africa

British Council – Cape Town

Street Address: 31 Brickfield Rd, Woodstock, Cape Town, 7925, South Africa

Telephone Number: +27 11 560 9300

Contact Email: [email protected]

Website URL: https://www.britishcouncil.org.za/exam/ielts

List of cities in South Africa where you can take the IELTS tests

  • Cape Town
  • Durban
  • Johannesburg
  • Port Elizabeth
  • Pretoria

More about South Africa

  • COUNTRYVV: Overview of labor market in South Africa, including latest unemployment rate and youth unemployment. Also covers job distribution by economic sectors, such as public sector, finance and hotels and restaurants.

IELTS Test Centers in South Africa

Population

The population of South Africa is a mixture of people of different skin color, culture, religion, language and tradition. In 1950 apartheid policy divided South Africans by law not only into blacks and whites, but also into coloreds and Asians. The assignment decided among other things. about the political rights, place of residence and schooling of the person concerned. But what was initially euphemistically described as the “program of separate development” developed into a systematic suppression of the black majority by the white minority. 79% of the total population mostly belong to one of the numerous peoples and tribes of the Bantu. The largest groups are the Zulu, Xhosa, Pedi, Tswana, Sotho, Tsonga, Swasi, Venda and Ndebele. About every ninth South African is colored. Coloreds are predominantly descendants of connections between Dutch settlers and the Cape Indigenous population (Khoikhoin). They also include the San, the last members of the oldest people in southern Africa, as well as the Cape Malay, Descendants of formerly abducted slaves from East India. The whites, mostly of Dutch and British origin, have a share of 8%. More than half of them speak Afrikaans, the rest speak English. At around 3%, Asians are the smallest group of the population. Most of them are the descendants of Indian contract workers. As a language that unites all population groups, English is of great importance. In addition to English, there are ten other official and common languages.┬áCheck vaultedwatches to see South Africa Travel Package.

Metropolitan areas in South Africa

Metropolitan areas ( population , last surveyed in 2011)
Metropolitan area Population Administrative seat (inh.)
Johannesburg 4,434,800 Johannesburg (957 400)
Cape Town 3,740,000 Cape Town (433 700)
eThekwini 3,442,400 Durban (595 100)
Ekurhuleni 3 178 500 Germiston (255 900)
Tshwane 2 921 500 Pretoria (741 700)
Nelson Mandela Bay 1 152 100 Port Elizabeth (312 400)

The country’s average population density is 47 residents / km 2. However, there is a strong east-west divide in the population distribution. The North Cape Province is very sparsely populated with three residents per km┬▓. In contrast, the province of Gauteng with the capital Pretoria (Tshwane) and the mining and financial center Johannesburg has the largest population concentration in the country: almost 25% of the total population live here on just 1.5% of the country’s area. Other rapidly growing metropolitan areas are Cape Town and the areas around Durban and Port Elizabeth. While whites live almost exclusively in cities, a large number of blacks still live in rural areas. The lifting of the restrictions on housing for the non-white population caused by the apartheid laws has since led to increased rural exodus from the backward rural areas. Meanwhile (2019) 67% of South Africans live in cities. The largest black African residential city is Soweto near Johannesburg.

Since 1994, the number of officially recorded emigrants has exceeded that of immigrants, although the number of illegal immigrants from neighboring countries, to which South Africa is very attractive, can hardly be recorded. More and more immigrants from West and Central Africa come to South Africa, which means that Johannesburg and Cape Town in particular have taken on a multicultural character in some parts of the city. Migrants from neighboring African countries have repeatedly been the target of racist attacks. The number of refugees is given by the UNHCR as (2018) 273,000.

Social: Even after the abolition of apartheid, the social gap between black and white still exists: Almost 30% of blacks are unemployed, just as many have no access to clean water. According to a government study from 2018, they own only 28% of the land despite a land reform that has been carried out since the end of apartheid. The overall level of infection with the HI virus in the adult population is 20.4% (2018).