IELTS Test Centers in Samoa

By | July 22, 2020

IELTS Testing Centres in Samoa

In total, there is no IELTS test center listed for Samoa that offer IELTS exams. You can select the one which is closer to you..

There are two types of test format available for IELTS exams: paper-based or computer-delivered. For both formats, the Speaking Section is done with a real IELTS examiner on a face-to-face basis.

Samoa

University of Auckland – Samoa

Street Address: Registration address Level 5 67 Symonds Street

Telephone Number: +64 9 919 7666/ +64 9 919 7695 ext 217

Contact Email: [email protected]

Website URL: www.ela.auckland.ac.nz/course-welcome_to_ielts_at_the_ela-5

Tonga

887 km

University of Auckland – Tonga

Street Address: Registration address Level 5 67 Symonds Street

Telephone Number: +64 9 919 7666/ +64 9 919 7695 ext 217

Contact Email: [email protected]

Website URL: www.ela.auckland.ac.nz/course-welcome_to_ielts_at_the_ela-5

Port Vila, Vanuatu

2259 km

University of Auckland – Port Vila

Street Address: To be held at, The University of the South Pacific, Emalus Campus, Port Vila

Telephone Number: +64 9 919 7666/ +64 9 919 7695 ext 217

Contact Email: [email protected]

Website URL: www.ela.auckland.ac.nz/course-welcome_to_ielts_at_the_ela-5

Kiribati

2379 km

University of Auckland – Kiribati

Street Address: Registration address Level 5 67 Symonds Street

Telephone Number: +64 9 919 7666/ +64 9 919 7695 ext 217

Contact Email: [email protected]

Website URL: www.ela.auckland.ac.nz/course-welcome_to_ielts_at_the_ela-5

Nauru

2736 km

University of Auckland – Nauru

Street Address: Registration address Level 5 67 Symonds Street

Telephone Number: +64 9 919 7666/ +64 9 919 7695 ext 217

Contact Email: [email protected]

Website URL: www.ela.auckland.ac.nz/course-welcome_to_ielts_at_the_ela-5

IELTS Test Centers in Samoa

Politics

According to the constitution that came into force on January 1, 1962 (revised several times), Samoa is a parliamentary monarchy in the Commonwealth. By constitutional amendment, the state name was changed from Western Samoa to Samoa in 1997. The head of state is elected by parliament for a period of five years. The legislature rests with the Legislative Assembly (Fono) with 49 members elected for five years. In 1991 the right to vote was introduced for all citizens over the age of 21; As before, only the registered heads of family associations (Matai) have the right to vote. At the head of the executive is the prime minister appointed by the head of state on the proposal of parliament.

National symbols

The national flag was introduced on June 1, 1948 and slightly modified in February 1949 by adding an additional star. The red cloth shows the Southern Cross constellation in the blue upper quarter on the Liek. Red stands for courage, blue is the color of freedom, white is the color of purity.

The coat of arms was introduced on April 12, 1951. It shows a blue and white bordered shield divided in a ratio of 1: 2. In the white upper part a coconut palm stands in front of green waves, in the lower blue part the Southern Cross. To commemorate the time of the UN mandate, the shield is placed on the circles of the UN emblem, on both sides it is surrounded by green olive branches; on the sign there is a blue, white and red bordered cross with red rays emanating from it (symbol of the Protestant faith of the majority of the population). The overall presentation is concluded at the bottom by a scroll with the motto “Fa’avae I Le Atua Samoa” (God be the basis of Samoa).

The national holiday is June 1st. It commemorates independence in 1962.

Parties

The most influential party is the Human Rights Protection Party (HRPP, founded 1979). The Tautua Samoa Party (TSP), founded in 2008, also plays a role.

Unions

The largest union is the Public Service Association (PSA) for members of the public service. There are also a few other small professional associations.

Military

Samoa does not have its own troops; New Zealand exercises the military protective function.

Administration

Samoa is administratively divided into 11 districts, which are based on traditional tribal areas.