IELTS Test Centers in Lithuania

By | July 22, 2020

IELTS Testing Centres in Lithuania

In total, there are 3 test locations in Lithuania that offer IELTS exams. You can select the one which is closer to you.

There are two types of test format available for IELTS exams: paper-based or computer-delivered. For both formats, the Speaking Section is done with a real IELTS examiner on a face-to-face basis.

Siauliai, Lithuania

British Council – Siauliai

Street Address: Antakalnio st. 2, 10308 Vilnius

Telephone Number: +37061404681

Contact Email: [email protected]

Website URL: http://www.britishcouncil.lt/exam/ielts

Klaipėda, Lithuania

British Council – Klaipeda

Street Address: Antakalnio st. 2, 10308 Vilnius

Telephone Number: +37061404681

Contact Email: [email protected]

Website URL: http://www.britishcouncil.lt/exam/ielts

Vilnius, Lithuania

British Council – Vilnius

Street Address: Antakalnio st. 2, 10308 Vilnius

Telephone Number: +37061404681

Contact Email: [email protected]

Website URL: http://www.britishcouncil.lt/exam/ielts

IELTS Test Dates Testing Locations Types of Exam Registration Fee (EUR)
2020/07/25 IELTS General Training 207
2020/08/22 IELTS Academic and IELTS General Training 207
2020/11/21 IELTS Academic and IELTS General Training 207
2020/12/5 IELTS Academic and IELTS General Training 207

IELTS Exam Fee in Lithuania

According to the test maker – British Council, the current cost to take IELTS test in Lithuania is 207 EUR.

List of cities in Lithuania where you can take the IELTS tests

  • Klaipeda
  • Siauliai
  • Vilnius

More about Lithuania

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IELTS Test Centers in Lithuania

Lithuanian Arts

Lithuanian art, the art on the territory of present-day Lithuania.

Early and Middle Ages: The oldest evidence includes ceramics and amber objects from the Neolithic as well as metal jewelry made of bronze and silver from the Bronze Age. In the Middle Ages, wood, clay, metal and amber work as well as weaving and embroidery dominated folk art; of the few surviving works from the 14th / 15th centuries. In the 19th century, the wall paintings in the moated castle on the island of Trakai are the most important. The fortified refuges (Piljakalnis) that formed the core of cities (Kaunas, Vilnius, Trakai) are remarkable. Gothic brick buildings were predominant in sacred buildings (Church of St. Anne in Vilnius, Church of Vytautas in Kaunas). Check plus-size-tips to see Little Lithuania.

Renaissance to 19th century: In architecture, after a short Renaissance period (Saint Michael in Vilnius, rebuilt in the 18th century), the Baroque, which was under Polish and Italian influence (including Saint Teresa and Saint Catherine in Vilnius; middle and end of the 17th century) followed). After the annexation to Russia (1795), a classicism influenced by there spread (M. Knackfuß, University Observatory in Vilnius; L. Štuoka-Gucevičius, reconstruction of the cathedral in Vilnius, 1786–1801; Karolis Podczaszynski, * 1760, † 1860, Evangelical Reformed Church, 1830–35). The art school attached to Vilnius University since 1803 played an important role in the development of a national art; in painting, elements of classicism merged with those of romanticism and realism (Jonas Dāmelis, * 1780, † 1840; Jonas Rustemas, * 1762, † 1835). The representatives of impressionism and naturalism included, among others. the painter Antanas Žmuidzinavičius (* 1876, † 1966) and the sculptor Juozas Zikaras (* 1876, † 1932). The painter and composer M. K. Čiurlionis became known as a representative of Art Nouveau.

Modernism and the present: In architecture, in addition to Art Nouveau elements (music theater in Kaunas, 1891–92, including 1923 expanded by Vladas Dubenecki, * 1888, † 1932), neo-classicist movements emerged (State Bank in Kaunas, 1925–29, by Mykolas Songaila, * 1874, † 1941) as well as a functionalism shaped by the German Bauhaus (main post office in Kaunas, 1932, by Feliksas Vizbaras, * 1880, † 1970). Based on the Scandinavian architectural tradition (especially A. Aalto) and the French-Swiss architect Le Corbusier, among other things, the satellite town of Lazdynai near Vilnius (1967–73, by Vytautas Cekanauskas, * 1930, † 2010) and the parliament building in Vilnius (1976-81, by Algymantas Nasvytis, * 1928, † 2018; Vytautas Nasvytis, * 1928, † 2016). Deconstructivist architectural concepts shaped the Lithuanian pavilion at the Expo 2000 in Hanover.

With the Kaunas art school founded in 1907, the connection to European modernism was achieved. Connections to art centers (Berlin, Paris, Moscow) influenced the national style of Lithuania. In the 1920s and 1930s, among other things, Vladas Eidukevičius (* 1891, † 1941), Antanas Samuolis (* 1899, † 1942) and the artists of the Ars group (Antanas Gudaitis, * 1904, † 1989; Vytautas K. Jonynas, * 1907, † 1997 and others). In Russia, France and / or the USA, among others, Varvara Stepanova (* 1894, † 1958), J. Lipchitz, Ben Shan (* 1898, † 1969), later also George Maciunas (* 1931, † 1978). While socialist realism shaped artistic creation under the Soviet rule, experimental directions of the post-avant-garde gained in importance since the 1960s in dealing with international style concepts (including the sculptors Bernardas Bucas, * 1903, † 1979; Gediminas Jokūbónis, * 1927, † 2006; the painter Vytautas Mack ế vičius, * 1911, † 1991; the graphic artist Antanas Kučas, * 1909, † 1989; Stasys Krasazier, * 1927, † 1977). In the post-communist society, the retro avant-garde takes up international art movements, which it seeks to combine with strategies of privatization and the specifics of Lithuanian national art. Since the 1990s, artists have been using painting, sculpture, installation art, photography and media art for differentiated, humorous and sometimes sarcastic analyzes that move between global, national and personal self-image. These include, for example, the critical appeal against drafts of identity (Audrius Novickas, * 1958; Academic Training Group, inter alia with Giedrius Kumetatis, * 1983), but also the appeal against the consequences of a new society of values ​​(e.g. Mindagas Navakas, * 1952; Karolis Jankus, * 1974) or against ideological manipulation (especially Deimantes Narkevicius, * 1964). Lead a feminist discourse among others. Ëgle Rakauskaitë (* 1967) and Violeta Bubelyté (* 1956).