High School CEEB Codes in Yemen

By | May 2, 2019

There are 3 high school codes in Yemen today, according to the ACT. The full list is shown below by city, with name of each high school and the city where the school is located (based on the ACT official site). You can search a school code by pressing “Ctrl” + “F” and then type school name or 6-digit school code.

Map of Yemen

High School Codes in Yemen

High School Codes by City

SANAA
SANAA INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL
  • High School Code
  • 699010
SANAA
YEMEN MODERN SCHOOL
  • High School Code
  • 699006
TAIZ
MOHAMED ALI OTHMAN SCHOOL
  • High School Code
  • 699005

The above lists CEEB codes (College Entrance Examination Board) for all accredited Yemen high schools. Please be informed that the list of high school codes in Yemen may change throughout the year. If you can’t find codes for the high schools of your interest, please write to us or come back at a later time. We will update our database soon after a new high school code is added to the country of Yemen.

Country Abbreviations

According to ABBREVIATIONFINDER, YEM is the three-letter country code of Yemen, and YE is the two-letter country code of Yemen. The two-letter suffix is used in top-level domains on the Internet as .ye.

Economy

Yemen is characterized as the poorest country in the Arabian Peninsula (1,182 GDP in 2008), presenting conditions of widespread underdevelopment despite the undoubted progress recorded with reunification. The GDP recorded in 2008 was US $ 27,151 million. The country’s economy reveals the persistence of territorial disparities; the former North Yemen remained extraneous to any colonization and therefore closed in a rigid feudal regime until the 1960s, subsequently oriented towards a market economy; the territories that made up South Yemen, on the other hand, which following the English colonization had instead known, albeit limited to the area of ​​Aden, sensitive economic incentives and greater openness to the outside, opted in the 1960s for a socialist economy, in conjunction with the nationalization measures for productive activities. The discovery of oil and natural gas fields in the early 1980s disrupted the country’s economic structure, previously based on agriculture. At the time of reunification in 1990, when Yemen moved towards the establishment of a market economy, Yemen had a state-dominated economic structure and an external debt equal to double the gross domestic product. The crisis of the At the time of reunification in 1990, when it moved towards the establishment of a market economy, Yemen had an economic structure dominated by the state and an external debt equal to double the gross domestic product. The crisis of the At the time of reunification in 1990, when it moved towards the establishment of a market economy, Yemen had an economic structure dominated by the state and an external debt equal to double the gross domestic product. The crisis of the the Gulf War, with the decision to support the Iraqi occupation, and the political instability between 1993 and 1994 led to a certain paralysis of productive activities. To cope with the difficult situation and following the suggestions of the International Monetary Fund, during 1995 the government launched a program of economic, administrative and financial reforms which met, however, strong social resistance; in the following years the program was temporarily blocked. Further interventions by international organizations on economic planning, dating back to the early 2000s, are aimed at limiting dependence on the oil sector, reducing contributions and exemptions, and modernizing the public administration, which is inefficient and weighs heavily on the costs of the State, and the financial system. But the results are partial and the GDP has had an average annual growth of 3.5% (between 2000 and 2006), below forecasts. Aid from abroad still constitutes an important item of GDP: in 2006, new funds were allocated by the Conference of Donor Countries and the Gulf Countries Fund. The continuing situation of instability and the tribal structure of society have so far compromised a real implementation of public and private projects and the implementation of the desired policies of transparency and incentives for foreign investments.