High School CEEB Codes in Norway

By | March 20, 2019

There are 11 high school codes in Norway today, according to the ACT. The full list is shown below by city, with name of each high school and the city where the school is located (based on the ACT official site). You can search a school code by pressing “Ctrl” + “F” and then type school name or 6-digit school code.

Map of Norway

High School Codes in Norway

High School Codes by City

AS
AS VIDEREGAENDE SKOLE
  • High School Code
  • 782281
BEKKESTUA
NORWEGIAN COLLEGE ELITE SPORTS
  • High School Code
  • 782002
BEKKESTUA
OSLO INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL
  • High School Code
  • 782029
BERGEN
INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF BERGEN
  • High School Code
  • 782020
FLEKKE
RED CROSS NORDIC UWC
  • High School Code
  • 782380
HAFRSFJORD
INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL STAVANGER
  • High School Code
  • 782410
OSLO
OSLO KATEDRALSKOLE
  • High School Code
  • 782001
OSLO
SONAS PRIVATGYMNAS
  • High School Code
  • 782301
SANDEFJORD
SKAGERAK INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL
  • High School Code
  • 782003
SOFIEMYR
OPPEGARD VIDEREGAENDE SKOLE
  • High School Code
  • 782282
STAVANGER
SAINT OLAV SCHOOL
  • High School Code
  • 782420

The above lists CEEB codes (College Entrance Examination Board) for all accredited Norway high schools. Please be informed that the list of high school codes in Norway may change throughout the year. If you can’t find codes for the high schools of your interest, please write to us or come back at a later time. We will update our database soon after a new high school code is added to the country of Norway.

Country Abbreviations

NOR is the three-letter country code of Norway, and NO is the two-letter country code of Norway. The two-letter suffix is used in top-level domains on the Internet as .no.

Population

In addition to the Norwegians, Sami (around 60,000; mainly in Finnmark) live as minorities, some of whom continue their traditional way of life as fishermen and reindeer herders, and the descendants of former immigrants from Finland (12,000) in the country; Russians on Svalbard too. The share of foreign citizens in the total population is (2015) 13% (mainly Poles, Swedes, Lithuanians, Somalis and Germans).

The population density (2017: 14 residents per km 2) is the lowest in mainland Europe. In Northern Norway (Finnmark) it sinks to 2 and rises over the Oslofjord area with 60–100 residents per km 2 to 1,440 residents per km 2in Oslo. In Finnmark and in the peripheral municipalities of Norway, the population is steadily decreasing. Because of the mountainous nature of the country, only a few settlement areas remain: the coastal platform, large valleys, terraces on the fjords and the few flatter areas on the coast (Jæren) or inland. Over 80% of all Norwegians live less than 15 km from the coast. In addition to the individual farms built up to the upper edges of the valley and on the outermost archipelago and the towns mostly located on the coast or at valley nodes (proportion of the urban population in 2017: 81%), the scattered and dense settlements (developed as market centers or as mining and industrial settlements) characteristic.

The biggest cities in Norway

Largest cities (population, estimate 2021)
Oslo 697,000
Mountains 285 600
Trondheim 207 600
Stavanger 144 100
Bærum 128 200

Religion

The constitution (last amended in May 2012) guarantees all citizens with the exception of the king freedom of religion (Articles 4 and 16 [previously Articles 2 and 4]). The most important and largest religious community, the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Norway (“Norske Kirke”), with its traditionally close ties to the Norwegian state, occupies a special position. Since the constitutional amendment mentioned, it is no longer the “official religion of the state”; rather, the amended Article 2 of the constitution declares Norway’s values ​​to be based on the “Christian and humanist heritage”. The Norwegian Church is no longer a state church in the narrower sense, but is still referred to in Article 16 as the “Church of Norway” and as such – in proportion to other religions – is state financed; all clergymen remain civil servants.profess Evangelical Lutheran faith. However, he is no longer obliged to protect and promote them; the right of church leadership previously held by the king is also no longer applicable (since 1984 parts of the power of attorney have been transferred to the general synod). Even after the constitutional reform, numerous tasks of the central church administration remain with the Ministry for Government Affairs, Reform and Church Affairs (until 2006 with the Ministry for Church and Education), but the church’s self-administration is given more powers, for example in the appointment of provosts and bishops.

The majority of the population is Christian: 71.5% (2016) officially belong to the Lutheran »Norske Kirke«, approx. 6% belong to other Protestant denominations (Pentecostals, Free Church Lutherans, Methodists, Baptists, etc.) or other Christian denominations such as the Catholic Church (2.9% of the population) or Orthodoxy. The “Norske Kirke” is divided into 11 dioceses. The Catholic Church comprises the exemte diocese of Oslo and two exemte territorial prelatures (Tromsø; Trondheim).

The largest, rapidly growing non-Christian religious minority are Muslims (just under 3% of the population; mosque in Oslo). There are also small groups of Buddhists, Hindus and Baha’is. There are Jewish communities (around 800 members in total) in Oslo (founded in 1892) and Trondheim (founded in 1905). Less than 17% of the population are without religious affiliation.