High School CEEB Codes in Madagascar

By | March 20, 2019

There are 2 high school codes in Madagascar today, according to the ACT. The full list is shown below by city, with name of each high school and the city where the school is located (based on the ACT official site). You can search a school code by pressing “Ctrl” + “F” and then type school name or 6-digit school code.

Map of Madagascar

High School Codes in Madagascar

High School Codes by City

101 ANTANANARIVO
AMERICAN SCHOOL ANTANANARIVO
  • High School Code
  • 623000
TOAMASINA
AMBATOVY INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL
  • High School Code
  • 623001

The above lists CEEB codes (College Entrance Examination Board) for all accredited Madagascar high schools. Please be informed that the list of high school codes in Madagascar may change throughout the year. If you can’t find codes for the high schools of your interest, please write to us or come back at a later time. We will update our database soon after a new high school code is added to the country of Madagascar.

Country Abbreviations

MDG is the three-letter country code of Madagascar, and MG is the two-letter country code of Madagascar. The two-letter suffix is used in top-level domains on the Internet as .mg.

Business

Measured in terms of gross national income (GNI) of (2017) US $ 400 per resident, Madagascar is one of the poorest developing countries. Madagascar has been pursuing a privatization and liberalization policy led by the World Bank and the IMF since the mid-1990s. Companies that were nationalized in the 1970s during the socialist phase are e.g. T. already privatized. These strategies enabled slow but steady growth at a very low level to be achieved, which was mainly supported by industry and the service sector. Domestic political unrest – for example in connection with the presidential elections in 2002 and the overthrow of the Ravalomanana government in 2009 – each triggered severe economic crises that led to a collapse in gross domestic product (2009: -3.7%; 2012: +1, 9%) and led to a deterioration in the living conditions of the population. The high level of foreign debt (2003: US $ 4.6 billion) was reduced to US $ 1.5 billion (2006) through debt relief initiatives by the IMF and World Bank; however, it has increased significantly again in recent years (2015: US $ 3.8 billion). The unstable domestic political situation, widespread corruption, a lack of infrastructure and, last but not least, the regular natural disasters are a lasting hindrance to Madagascar’s economic development. The situation is still characterized by high inflation (2015: 7.4%), unemployment and underemployment, especially among the young population, and an extensive informal sector. US- $) was reduced to 1.5 billion US- $ (2006) through debt relief initiatives by the IMF and World Bank; however, it has increased significantly again in recent years (2015: US $ 3.8 billion). The unstable domestic political situation, widespread corruption, a lack of infrastructure and, last but not least, the regular natural disasters are a lasting hindrance to Madagascar’s economic development. The situation is still characterized by high inflation (2015: 7.4%), unemployment and underemployment, especially among the young population, and an extensive informal sector.

Foreign trade: The trade balance is chronically negative (import value 2013: 3.1 billion US $, export value: 1.8 billion US $). The most important export goods are textiles (24.6%) as well as agricultural and fishery products (25.1%; vanilla, cloves, cocoa, coffee, fish, shrimp). Crude oil, (semi) finished products for the textile industry, consumer goods and food are imported. The main trading partners are France, China, the United Arab Emirates, the USA and the Netherlands.

Agriculture

Agriculture still forms the economic basis of the country; Around 75% of the employed generate (2015) 24.1% of the gross domestic product (GDP) and 30% of the export revenues (mainly with vanilla and cloves ). About 7% of the country’s area (especially in the central highlands) is used as arable land, another 64% (mainly in the west and south) as pastureland. Agriculture is mostly practiced as a subsistence economy. For the vanilla cultivated in the east and northwest of the island, Madagascar is the second largest producer in the world; Also of global economic importance are the cloves growing on the island of Nosy Boraha and on the east coast north of Toamasina, as well as the pepper, which comes mainly from the island of Nosy Be. The ylang-ylang trees provide essential oils. Other agricultural products for export are cocoa, coffee, cowhide and fruit. The staple foods rice, cassava and maize are mainly grown in small family businesses, with rice cultivation being of paramount importance. Livestock breeding mainly includes cattle (2012 population: 10.1 million), but pigs, goats and sheep are also kept. To supply the population, Madagascar is dependent on imports and international food aid, especially since agriculture is regularly severely damaged by storms (cyclones), plagues of locusts and epidemics.

Forestry: The forest stands are declining due to deforestation and slash and burn; their share of the land area is (2013) 21.5%. In addition to the high demand for firewood (98%), its use is limited to the extraction of resins, tannins and dyes as well as raffia palm bast due to the lack of infrastructure.

Fishing: Fishing (catch in 2012: 115 700 t) and aquaculture farming have become more important for export in recent years. Are executed inter alia. Haddock, tuna and crustaceans. In addition, the breeding of shrimp has become a notable branch of industry.