High School CEEB Codes in Ireland

By | March 20, 2019

There are 31 high school codes in Ireland today, according to the ACT. The full list is shown below by city, with name of each high school and the city where the school is located (based on the ACT official site). You can search a school code by pressing “Ctrl” + “F” and then type school name or 6-digit school code.

Map of Ireland

High School Codes in Ireland

High School Codes by City

ATHLONE
OUR LADYS BOWER SECONDARY SCH
  • High School Code
  • 745035
BALLYCASTLE
CROSS AND PASSION COLLEGE
  • High School Code
  • 765002
BANGOR
BANGOR GRAMMAR SCHOOL
  • High School Code
  • 765001
BRAY
SAINT GERARDS SCHOOL
  • High School Code
  • 745662
CLANE
CLONGOWES WOOD COLLEGE
  • High School Code
  • 745481
CLONTARF DUBLIN
MOUNT TEMPLE COMPREHENSIVE SCH
  • High School Code
  • 745326
CO TIPPERARY
ROCKWELL COLLEGE
  • High School Code
  • 745120
COUNTY CORK
MOUNT ST MICHAEL SECONDARY SCH
  • High School Code
  • 745142
CROOM
COLAISTE CHIARAIN
  • High School Code
  • 745049
DERRY
THORNHILL COLLEGE
  • High School Code
  • 745670
DUBLIN
CTR FOR TALENTED YOUTH IRELAND
  • High School Code
  • 745245
DUBLIN
KINGS HOSPITAL
  • High School Code
  • 745061
DUBLIN
RATHDOWN SCHOOL
  • High School Code
  • 745370
DUBLIN
SAINT ANDREWS COLLEGE
  • High School Code
  • 745420
DUBLIN
SANCTA MARIA COLLEGE
  • High School Code
  • 745421
DUBLIN
SUTTON PARK SCHOOL
  • High School Code
  • 745710
DUBLIN 4
SAINT CONLETHS COLLEGE
  • High School Code
  • 745440
DUNDALK
DUNDALK GRAMMAR SCHOOL
  • High School Code
  • 745502
ENNISKILLEN
DEVENISH COLLEGE
  • High School Code
  • 765103
ENNISKILLEN
ERNE INTEGRATED COLLEGE
  • High School Code
  • 765000
GALWAY
SAINT JOSEPHS PATRICIAN COLL
  • High School Code
  • 745485
GALWAY
SAINT MARYS COLLEGE
  • High School Code
  • 745890
GORMANSTON
FRANCISCAN COLLEGE GORMANSTON
  • High School Code
  • 745520
LIMERICK
CRESCENT COLLEGE COMPREHENSIVE
  • High School Code
  • 745501
LISBURN
SOUTH EASTERN REGIONAL COLLEGE
  • High School Code
  • 765095
LONDONDERRY
DU PONT TRAINING CENTER
  • High School Code
  • 765100
LONDONDERRY
FOYLE COLLEGE
  • High School Code
  • 765102
MAYNOOTH
MAYNOOTH POST PRIMARY SCHOOL
  • High School Code
  • 745489
NEWBRIDGE
PATRICIAN SECONDARY SCHOOL
  • High School Code
  • 745663
SLIGO
SUMMERHILL COLLEGE
  • High School Code
  • 745700
VIRGINIA
VIRGINIA COLLEGE
  • High School Code
  • 745062

The above lists CEEB codes (College Entrance Examination Board) for all accredited Ireland high schools. Please be informed that the list of high school codes in Ireland may change throughout the year. If you can’t find codes for the high schools of your interest, please write to us or come back at a later time. We will update our database soon after a new high school code is added to the country of Ireland.

Country Abbreviations

IRL is the three-letter country code of Ireland, and IE is the two-letter country code of Ireland. The two-letter suffix is used in top-level domains on the Internet as .ie.

Natural resources

In addition to minable zinc and lead ore deposits, there are small reserves of lithium, tungsten, barite and gold. The zinc and lead ore deposits are among the richest in Europe. Mining has taken place near Navan north of Dublin since 1977, in Galmoy since 1997 and in Lisheen since 1999 (closed in 2009 and 2016 respectively). Ireland has extensive peat deposits, which are mainly used for briquette production (domestic fuel), fertilizer production and energy generation (power plants). In 2017, 5.3% of households still used peat for (climate-damaging) heating. The amount of peat extracted was 3.5 million t in the same year.

Population

The population is predominantly of Celtic descent. The share of non-Irish people was 11.8% in 2017.

English is the general lingua franca. Irish, a Celtic language, is subsidized by the state and is also an official language, but is only spoken by around 2% of the (2019) 4.9 million residents every day. In contrast, almost 40% of those surveyed in the 2016 census stated that they could communicate in Irish. Many public signs and information are bilingual.

Ireland is one of the classic emigration countries in Europe. From the peak of the population (around 6.5 million people lived in the area of ​​what is now the Republic of Ireland in 1841), the number of residents had continuously declined to 2.82 million in 1961 due to poor living conditions, as a result of which over 1 million people died and 2 million people emigrated, most of them to the United States.

Another wave of emigration followed after the Second World War. Between 1951 and 1961, around 40,800 people emigrated annually, mainly to Great Britain. Through state-sponsored industrialization There was a reversal of the trend in 1971–79 (annual immigration gain around 13,600 people). Combined with strong natural population growth, Ireland’s population increased by 15.3% in 1971-81. A deterioration in the economic situation and the resulting high unemployment (1987: 19.2%) caused the number of emigrants to rise again in 1981-91 (annual migration losses of around 20,600 people). With the gradual improvement of the economic situation from 1991, the population grew by 11.1% until 2002. The balance of migration, which only slipped into negative territory during the global economic and financial crisis (from 2007), totaled +4.0 per 1,000 residents (2017). The population density is currently over 70 residents per km 2. Almost a quarter of the population lives in the urban agglomeration of Dublin.

The biggest cities in Ireland

Biggest Cities (Residents 2016)
Dublin *) 553 200
Cork 125 600
Galway 79 500
limerick 58 300
Waterford 48 400
*) Agglomeration: 1,173,200 pop.

Media

Eight nationally distributed daily newspapers appear with a circulation of between 40,000 and 140,000 copies. The papers with the highest circulation include “Irish Independent” (founded in 1905), “The Irish Times” (founded in 1859) and the Irish editions of the British tabloids “Daily Mirror” and “The Sun”. There are also around 50 regional and local newspapers, mostly weekly.

Ireland has around 40 TV channels, six of which are Irish-speaking. The public broadcaster Raidió Teilefís Éireann (RTÉ) broadcasts two television programs. The Irish-language broadcaster “Teilefís na Gailge”, founded in 1996, was renamed “TG 4” in 1999 and has been independent since 2007. The only private television channel since 1998 has been »TV 3«. In addition to the Northern Irish “UTV” (“Ulster Television”), numerous British cable, satellite and pay TV programs can be received. In addition to the nine radio programs broadcast by RTÉ (including the Irish-language “Raidió na Gaeltachta”) there are several private broadcasters, of which only “Today FM” is broadcast nationwide.