High School CEEB Codes in El Salvador

By | March 20, 2019

There are 11 high school codes in El Salvador today, according to the ACT. The full list is shown below by city, with name of each high school and the city where the school is located (based on the ACT official site). You can search a school code by pressing “Ctrl” + “F” and then type school name or 6-digit school code.

Map of El Salvador

High School Codes in El Salvador

High School Codes by City

COL ESCALON
ABC BILINGUAL SCHOOL
  • High School Code
  • 846461
COLONIA ESCALON
ESCUELA PANAMERICANA
  • High School Code
  • 846475
SAN MIGUEL
ACADEMIA EUROPEA SALVADORENA
  • High School Code
  • 846180
SAN SALVADOR
COLEGIO INTL DE SAN SALVADOR
  • High School Code
  • 846478
SAN SALVADOR
COLEGIO MAYA
  • High School Code
  • 846407
SAN SALVADOR
ESCUELA AMERICANA
  • High School Code
  • 846400
SAN SALVADOR
HIGHLANDS SAN SALVADOR
  • High School Code
  • 846460
SANTA ANA
ESCUELA INTERAMERICANA
  • High School Code
  • 846489
SANTA TECLA
ACADEMIA BRITANICA CUSCATLECA
  • High School Code
  • 846480
SANTA TECLA
COLEGIO LA FLORESTA
  • High School Code
  • 846021
SANTA TECLA
COLEGIO LAMATEPEC
  • High School Code
  • 846020

The above lists CEEB codes (College Entrance Examination Board) for all accredited El Salvador high schools. Please be informed that the list of high school codes in El Salvador may change throughout the year. If you can’t find codes for the high schools of your interest, please write to us or come back at a later time. We will update our database soon after a new high school code is added to the country of El Salvador.

Country Abbreviations

SLV is the three-letter country code of El Salvador, and SV is the two-letter country code of El Salvador. The two-letter suffix is used in top-level domains on the Internet as .sv.

Economy

The fertile and well-irrigated volcanic lands are the main resource of this small country, which bases its economy on agriculture, even with all the negative implications of depending, in practice, on a single product, coffee. The country is very poor in resources and the repercussions deriving from the accentuated political instability, the huge military spending and internal conflicts have only aggravated the economic and social situation, already heavily penalized by the fall in the prices of the main export products on international markets, which took place between the eighties and nineties of the twentieth century. One of the main obstacles for the development of the country is represented by the almost total concentration of the economy in the hands of the so-called “200 families” of landowners, whose real power has always prevented any attempt at equitable redistribution of land (and therefore of income): actors in an almost uninterrupted series of terrorist actions throughout the national territory, consequent to the first weak attempts at democratic reform of land management, such forces also effectively rendered ineffective the land reform of 1980, which provided for extensive expropriation of large estates. Industrial development also appears to be completely blocked, unable to feed endogenous development processes even in correspondence with the weak signs of recovery found in coincidence with foreign investments, whose incentive appears among the priority objectives of the government, which tends to favor the entry of private individuals in sectors traditionally pertaining to the state, such as energy and telecommunications. These plans, together with the pacification of the country started in the early nineties, accompanied a general process of social and political reconstruction, characterized by structural reforms at the institutional and economic level: from that moment, the economy of El Salvador appeared in growth (4-5% on average per year), reaching a GDP of US $ 22,115 million and a GDP in 2007 per capita equal to US $ 3,824. Remittances from Salvadorans who emigrated to the United States were also on the rise, representing the country’s main source of foreign currency; a notable boost was also given to tourism. Inflation had decreased, while external indebtedness and public debt remained high, amounting to over 40% of GDP in 2007. Over the past 10 years, growth rates have slowed down slightly; in 2018 the GDP was US $ 26,057 million and the per capita GDP of US $ 3,924.

Agriculture

Agriculture, which covers almost 40% of the territorial surface and occupies a fifth of the active population, is largely conducted with archaic and unprofitable techniques. The primary sector participates in the formation of GDP for 6.4% (2018); the most profitable crops are those coming from plantations of products destined for export: firstly coffee, grown in the highlands, then sugar cane, cotton, tobacco and sesame. Most of the farmers, however, obtain basic foodstuffs from their micro-funds, especially corn, the basis of the Salvadorans’ diet, rice (whose production has been introduced in some coastal areas), sorghum, and dried beans; vegetables, citrus fruits and various tropical fruits (pineapples, mangoes, bananas, etc.) are also grown. § Timber production is rather limited, given the now limited extension of the forest area (12.79%); however, there are precious essences such as cedar, mahogany, rosewood, indigo and the so-called balsam of Peru, widely used in the cosmetics industry and of which El Salvador is one of the world’s leading producers. § Breeding is fairly widespread, especially for cattle, which exploit relatively large natural pastures (38.3% of the total area); § On the other hand, fishing is modest, despite government interventions to strengthen the sector cosmetics industry and of which El Salvador is one of the world’s largest producers. § Breeding is fairly widespread, especially for cattle, which exploit relatively large natural pastures (38.3% of the total area); § On the other hand, fishing is modest, despite government interventions to strengthen the sector cosmetics industry and of which El Salvador is one of the world’s largest producers. § Breeding is fairly widespread, especially for cattle, which exploit relatively large natural pastures (38.3% of the total surface); § On the other hand, fishing is modest, despite government interventions to strengthen the sector