High School CEEB Codes in Azerbaijan

By | March 20, 2019

There are 7 high school codes in Azerbaijan today, according to the ACT. The full list is shown below by city, with name of each high school and the city where the school is located (based on the ACT official site). You can search a school code by pressing “Ctrl” + “F” and then type school name or 6-digit school code.

Map of Azerbaijan

High School Codes in Azerbaijan

High School Codes by City

BAKU
BAKU INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL
  • High School Code
  • 661001
BAKU
BAKU OXFORD SCHOOL
  • High School Code
  • 661007
BAKU
EUROPEAN AZERBAIJAN SCHOOL
  • High School Code
  • 661003
BAKU
INTERNATIONAL SCH AZERBAIJAN
  • High School Code
  • 661000
BAKU
ISTAK LYCEUM
  • High School Code
  • 661004
BAKU
LYCEUM 6
  • High School Code
  • 661005
BAKU
SABIS SUN INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL
  • High School Code
  • 611008

The above lists CEEB codes (College Entrance Examination Board) for all accredited Azerbaijan high schools. Please be informed that the list of high school codes in Azerbaijan may change throughout the year. If you can’t find codes for the high schools of your interest, please write to us or come back at a later time. We will update our database soon after a new high school code is added to the country of Azerbaijan.

Country Abbreviations

AZE is the three-letter country code of Azerbaijan, and AZ is the two-letter country code of Azerbaijan. The two-letter suffix is used in top-level domains on the Internet as .az.

Business

As early as the Soviet era, the Azerbaijani economy was monostructured and one-sidedly geared towards the provision of raw materials, especially crude oil. With the independence of the state in 1991, a market economy-oriented economic transformation began and regulatory reforms were introduced; In addition, greater independence from the Russian-dominated economic area and closer ties to Turkey were sought. Up until the mid-1990s, economic development was characterized by a severe economic crisis, a sharp decline in economic performance and a rapid deterioration in the social situation. In addition to the general problems of the systemic economic transition, the war with Armenia over Nagorno-Karabakh exacerbated the lack of domestic political stability, the widespread corruption and clientele economy as well as the inadequate development of market economy institutions the situation. Thanks to some of those still in state ownershipSince 1997, however, the country has recorded high economic growth rates of up to 34.5% per year for oil and natural gas production (2006; 2013: 5.8%).

 

Agriculture

Due to the increased raw materials sector, the share of the agricultural sector in GDP is falling (2015: 6.2%). Nevertheless, around 36% of the workforce is employed in agriculture, forestry and fishing. A good half of the territory is used for agriculture, of which 1.9 million ha of arable land (74% irrigation area) and pasture areas 2.7 million ha, the rest to fruit and wine-growing areas, tea plantations and areas for special crops. In addition to the fertile areas in Central and North Azerbaijan, where grain, cotton, wine, tobacco and mulberry trees are grown for traditional silkworm breeding, the Lenkoran area is part of the growing area for rice, citrus fruits, saffron and tea. The winter pastures in the lowlands and summer pastures in the mountains are used for cattle breeding (sheep and cattle).

Fisheries: The once important fishing in the Caspian Sea (especially caviar production) is falling sharply due to uncontrolled catches and especially due to marine pollution caused by oil production. The sturgeon of the Caspian Sea has been threatened by fish poaching and the destruction of its natural habitat since around 2000; Attempts are made to protect the stocks through protection programs and industrial rearing.

Natural resources

Mining has a share of 26.4% of GDP. Azerbaijan has minable deposits of iron, copper, molybdenum and barite ores (in the Lesser Caucasus) as well as gold, alunite, marble, pebbles and rock salt. The most important raw materials, however, are high-quality crude oil and natural gas. The first oil drilling took place in 1847, industrial development began in 1871, and the region around Baku developed at the end of the 19th centurythe world’s most important center of the oil industry. Production on the open sea began in 1947 (Neftjanyje Kamni oil rig). The development areas are mainly located on the Apscheron peninsula and in the offshore area. Natural gas is also extracted on the Kura-Arax plain near Karadag. In 1994, the Azerbaijani government signed the “contract of the century” between the state oil company SOCAR and an international consortium of large international oil companies led by BP on new development and production activities involving investments of several billion US dollars. This mainly concerns the exploitation of oil and gas fields in the Azerbaijani sector of the Caspian Sea (Azeri-Tschirag-Güneschli). The largest natural gas field is located 55 km southeast of Baku in the Caspian Sea (Shah-Denis).3. Some of the natural gas from Shah-Denis is routed via the South Caucasus Pipeline (BTE) to Turkey and from there on to Europe. Oil pipelines run from Baku to the Novorossisk oil terminal (Russia), from Baku to the Mediterranean port of Ceyhan (Turkey) and from Baku to the Black Sea port of Supsa (Georgia).