High School CEEB Codes in Argentina

By | March 20, 2019

There are 10 high school codes in Argentina today, according to the ACT. The full list is shown below by city, with name of each high school and the city where the school is located (based on the ACT official site). You can search a school code by pressing “Ctrl” + “F” and then type school name or 6-digit school code.

Map of Argentina

High School Codes in Argentina

High School Codes by City

BUENOS AIRES
ASOCIACION ESCUELAS LINCOLN
  • High School Code
  • 900150
BUENOS AIRES
HOLY TRINITY COLLEGE
  • High School Code
  • 950020
BUENOS AIRES
ISLANDS INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL
  • High School Code
  • 900230
BUENOS AIRES
NORTHLANDS SCHOOL
  • High School Code
  • 900300
BUENOS AIRES
SAINT ANDREWS SCOTS SCHOOL
  • High School Code
  • 900351
BUENOS AIRES
SAINT GEORGES COLLEGE
  • High School Code
  • 900450
CORDOBA
COLEGIO SAN PATRICO BILINGUE
  • High School Code
  • 900311
LOS POLVORINES
SAINT GEORGES COLLEGE NORTH
  • High School Code
  • 900310
MAR DEL PLATA
NORTHERN HILLS SCHOOL
  • High School Code
  • 900460
SAN FERNANDO
BUENOS AIRES INTL CHRISTIAN AC
  • High School Code
  • 900500

The above lists CEEB codes (College Entrance Examination Board) for all accredited Argentina high schools. Please be informed that the list of high school codes in Argentina may change throughout the year. If you can’t find codes for the high schools of your interest, please write to us or come back at a later time. We will update our database soon after a new high school code is added to the country of Argentina.

Country Abbreviations

ARG is the three-letter country code of Argentina, and AR is the two-letter country code of Argentina. The two-letter suffix is used in top-level domains on the Internet as .ar.

Agriculture

With its extensive areas and highly developed technology, the agricultural sector is still a mainstay of the Argentine economy. The core area of ​​agriculture for both arable farming and cattle breeding are the five provinces of the Pampa Belt. Most of the agricultural land is owned by large landowners, most of whom have them farmed by tenants. The economic importance of agriculture (including fisheries) has decreased in terms of its contribution to GDP (share in 2016: 7.6%); nevertheless Argentina generates almost half of its export revenues from the sale of agricultural products in processed and unprocessed form. Because of the favorable conditions for arable farming (loess soils, warm and humid climate), the arable land including permanent crops (14, 7% of the total area) at the expense of permanent meadows and pastures (39.6% of the total area). The most important products are oil seeds (especially Soybeans, sunflower seeds), wheat, corn and sorghum. Other important agricultural products are sugar cane, cotton, vegetables and fruits (especially grapes, apples and citrus fruits) and honey. Argentina ranks sixth among the wine-growing countries.

The traditionally very important livestock breeding, especially cattle breeding on the extensive pastures of the pampas, is largely still practiced as extensive pasture farming. Due to state price and export restrictions, the number of cattle has decreased continuously in recent years (2014: 51.6 million). The decline in sheep breeding, especially in Eastern Patagonia, in the south of the province of Buenos Aires and in the inter-rivers, is attributed to the switch from wool to meat production and the displacement from the pampas region (sheep population: around 14.7 million). Despite the decreasing importance of cattle breeding, Argentina is still one of the largest meat producers in the world.

Livestock raising in Argentina

Although Argentina is considered an agricultural country, agriculture only accounts for around 8% of the gross domestic product. In contrast, there is export, here the share of agricultural goods is around 50%, with the majority being meat products.

In 1552, Portuguese adventurers brought the first cattle to the country, followed by Spanish settlers with shiploads of cattle, sheep and horses around 1600. The animals went wild in the pampas and multiplied uncontrollably. Everyone who lived here had the right to use the animals as long as they did not belong to any settlement. Affiliation was marked by a brand. Anyone who was caught as a cattle thief was also branded and hanged if repeated. The cattle were so abundant that they were almost worthless. That changed at the end of the 18th century when the English started the meat trade and transported cured meat to the plantations in the West Indies as food for the slaves. Now livestock became valuable and meat an important export item. Argentine cattle breeders crossed their native breed with European cattle. English cattle eventually supplanted the native breeds. When it was possible to breed more specifically with the help of artificial insemination in the 20th century, today’s meat-containing cattle breeds for steakhouses emerged. In addition to the preferred breeds (including Hereford), German Simmental cattle can also be found on the pastures today.

The most important event for the Argentine ranchers is the agricultural fair in Buenos Aires, which takes place annually in August. It has been organized since 1875 by the Sociedad Rural (Agricultural Society), to which practically all cattle breeders belong. In 1901, the city of Buenos Aires founded a cattle market outside its gates – today the Mataderos district – which quickly developed into the world’s largest transshipment point for live cattle and at the end of the 1950s marketed up to 40,000 animals a day. Today, almost 20,000 animals are still handled here every day and auctioned off at the slaughterhouses. The stables cover an area of ​​30 hectares. Because the best prices can be achieved here, the cattle breeders transport their animals to the cattle market in Buenos Aires by truck and sometimes also by train.

Forestry: In contrast to its neighboring countries, Argentina has little commercial forest; a total of 10% of the total area is forested (mainly bush and dry forest). The use is still partly due to overexploitation. New plantings in the Paraná delta area are mainly used for the pulp industry.

Fisheries: In the fishing industry, Argentina has secured rich fishing grounds for itself after expanding its territorial waters to 200 nautical miles; the fishing fleet was expanded. After a phase of unchecked expansion, the government has been trying to prevent overfishing since the late 1990s by setting catch quotas. In 2014 the landings amounted to 833,900 t.