GRE Test Centers in Japan

By | August 27, 2019

GRE Testing Locations

Decided to take GRE exam? Now it is time to determine where to take the test.  This site provides a full list of GRE testing centers in Japan, among which, you can choose one that is nearest to you. Good news is that the following GRE test locations in Japan offer both GRE general test and the GRE subject tests.

GRE Test Centers in Japan

  1. 8601, TOKYO, JAPAN#1 – APCU-8601
    Ochanomizu Sola City Academia 5F,, 4-6 Kanda Surugadai Chiyoda-ku, Telephone 03-3258-9151, TOKYO
    Japan 1010062
    Computer Based Test
  2. 8612, TOKYO, JAPAN#4 – APCU-8612
    Ochanomizu Sola City Academia 5F,, 4-6 Kanda Surugadai Chiyoda-ku, Telephone 03-3258-9151, TOKYO
    Japan 1010062
    Computer Based Test
  3. 8621, TOKYO, JAPAN#2 – APCU-8621
    Ochanomizu Sola City Academia 5F,, 4-6 Kanda Surugadai Chiyoda-ku, Telephone 03-3258-9151, TOKYO
    Japan 1010062
    Computer Based Test
  4. 8622, TOKYO,JAPAN#3 – APCU-8622
    Ochanomizu Sola City Academia 5F,, 4-6 Kanda Surugadai Chiyoda-ku, Telephone 03-3258-9151, TOKYO
    Japan 1010062
    Computer Based Test

GRE Test Dates

There are two types of test format offered by the test maker – ETS: Computer-delivered and Paper-delivered GRE general tests.  For computer based test format, the GRE General Test is offered year-round on a continuous basis, and available for registration on a first-come, first-served basis. For paper based general test,  testing is available three times per year. The following test dates apply:

Test Dates for Paper Based Deadlines for Registration Scores Available
November 09, 2019 October 4, 2019 December 20, 2019
February 1, 2020 December 27, 2019 March 13, 2020

GRE Subject Tests in Japan

The GRE Subject Tests are available on paper based only. In all GRE test centers throughout the world (both inside and outside United States), the exam is available three times a year. The three test dates are:

  • April
  • September
  • October

GRE Testing Locations in Japan

More about Japan

  • ALLCOUNTRYLIST: Overview of major industries in Japan, including mining, construction, transportation, tourism, and foreign trade.

Climate

Latitude and monsoons determine the weather pattern in Japan, which is differentiated by the shape of the island itself, the rich horizontal and vertical structure and the ocean currents. The general weather situation is controlled by four air masses: the continental polar air originating in Siberia, the maritime polar air over the Sea of ​​Okhotsk , the maritime tropical air over the Pacific and the continental tropical air over subtropical China. The shift of the polar front (area in which the northern and southern air masses meet) structures the weather pattern of the year. In June, it strikes from central China to southern and central Japan. The cyclones moving along itbring early summer rain (June / July). In July, it runs from northern China to Hokkaidō, which receives rainfall, while the arch of the island south of the front has dry, hot weather. In autumn the spring situation sets in again with rain in connection with typhoons , which often cause great devastation. In winter, the cold Siberian air that hits the west coast of Japan brings snow. Check a2zcamerablog to see Japan Tour Plan.

According to the great north-south extension, Japan has a strong temperature gradient. A mean summer temperature in the warmest month of 21 ° C in the north is compared to 28 ° C in the south, while a mean winter temperature in the coldest month of −7.8 ° C in the north is compared to 16 ° C in the south. Japan receives abundant rainfall (annual average: Sapporo 1,140 mm, Yakushima 3,820 mm).

Vegetation

The vegetation of Japan is part of the East Asian flora region. The north and the altitudes above 1,800 m above sea level are characterized by boreal coniferous forests (firs, spruces, Japanese cedars, etc.) as well as hardy deciduous trees (larches, birches, alders, dogwoods); they are joined by deciduous deciduous forests to the south (with deciduous species from Central Europe), with increasing admixture of evergreen species to the south. In the subtropical south, evergreen deciduous forests (especially evergreen oaks, laurels, camphor trees) are widespread. In some cases, a high proportion of the forests is made up of bamboo , which dominates both the alpine altitude level together with dwarf trees and most of the other forest formations as undergrowth. On the Ryūkyūinseln always greener place rainforest , on the coastal mangroves. The ginkgo tree is a “living fossil” and is only found in parks and as a street tree today.

The original vegetation was very species-rich due to the fact that Japan was spared from the Ice Ages; however, it has undergone profound changes through man. Around 40% of the forests (which cover around two thirds of the surface of Japan) are reforested areas, with the primary forests in the boreal zone as well as in the subtropical humid forests being replaced by mostly species-poor secondary forests. Large parts of the former forest areas were also replaced by wet rice fields, dry field crops, cedar forests, bamboo groves and parks.

Wildlife

Since Japan belongs to the Palearctic fauna region, its fauna is related to that of Europe. In the last Ice Age, Japan was a refuge for many species that had been displaced by the ice. Some could not repopulate their original areas after the Ice Age and today show disjoint occurrences (disjunction), e.g. B. the blue magpie. The northernmost species of monkey is the intelligent and gifted red-faced macaque.

The giant salamander, which is over 1 m long, lives in clear mountain streams in Honshū. In addition to numerous species of fish, whales, sea turtles and sea snakes also live in the fish-rich Japanese waters. To be fished v. a. Salmon, sardines, tuna, herrings, cod and puffer fish , which are called “fugu” in Japan and are considered a special delicacy due to their highly poisonous organs.

Over a third of the bird species found in Japan are water birds, the songbirds are represented with around 150 species.

As a result of the extensive destruction of natural habitats, many species (brown bears, monkeys, wild boars, deer, etc.) can only stay in protected areas. Hunting, reclamation and pollution have wiped out the wolf, the Japanese and the East Asian black-beaked white stork. The red-crowned crane is also threatened with extinction.