GRE Test Centers in Jamaica

By | August 27, 2019

GRE Testing Locations

Decided to take GRE exam? Now it is time to determine where to take the test.  This site provides a full list of GRE testing centers in Jamaica, among which, you can choose one that is nearest to you. Good news is that the following GRE test locations in Jamaica offer both GRE general test and the GRE subject tests.

GRE Test Centers in Jamaica

  1. University of the West Indies – STN10367A
    Departrment of Chemistry, Computer Resource Room , -Downstairs near lecture theatre room 5-, Kingston
    Jamaica
    Computer Based Test

GRE Test Dates

There are two types of test format offered by the test maker – ETS: Computer-delivered and Paper-delivered GRE general tests.  For computer based test format, the GRE General Test is offered year-round on a continuous basis, and available for registration on a first-come, first-served basis. For paper based general test,  testing is available three times per year. The following test dates apply:

Test Dates for Paper Based Deadlines for Registration Scores Available
November 09, 2019 October 4, 2019 December 20, 2019
February 1, 2020 December 27, 2019 March 13, 2020

GRE Subject Tests in Jamaica

The GRE Subject Tests are available on paper based only. In all GRE test centers throughout the world (both inside and outside United States), the exam is available three times a year. The three test dates are:

  • April
  • September
  • October

GRE Testing Locations in Jamaica

More about Jamaica

  • ALLCOUNTRYLIST: Overview of major industries in Jamaica, including mining, construction, transportation, tourism, and foreign trade.

History

Jamaica was founded by C. Columbus in 1494 discovered on his second trip. His heirs received the island as a manorial estate in 1536. As the Indian population (Aruak) soon became extinct – a result of introduced diseases, Spanish oppression and tribal struggles – some wealthy families bought the island and set up sugar cane plantations which they managed with African slaves. The conquest of Jamaica by the English (1655) had to be recognized by Spain in 1670. At the end of the 17th century, Jamaica developed into the most important British plantation colony in the Caribbean and one of the largest transshipment centers for the slave trade (until 1807) and for all smuggled goods of the Hispanic American colonies until their independence. Falling sugar prices and the liberation of slaves (1833–38) led to the economic decline and loss of power of the white planter class. Despite the property qualification in the electoral law, it lost its majority in the Jamaican parliament to non-whites. After the discontent of black plantation workers led to riots (Morant Bay Rebellion) in 1865, which were bloodily suppressed, the colony’s parliament and the right to self-government were abolished. The British governor ruled instead with an appointed legislative council. It was not until 1884 that local elected councils were permitted again. After the discontent of black plantation workers led to riots (Morant Bay Rebellion) in 1865, which were bloodily suppressed, the colony’s parliament and the right to self-government were abolished. The British governor ruled instead with an appointed legislative council. It was not until 1884 that local elected councils were permitted again. After the discontent of black plantation workers led to riots (Morant Bay Rebellion) in 1865, which were bloodily suppressed, the colony’s parliament and the right to self-government were abolished. The British governor ruled instead with an appointed legislative council. It was not until 1884 that local elected councils were permitted again. Check clothesbliss to see Jamaica As a Destination Country.

1941-50 the United States maintained air bases in Jamaica. After social unrest intensified in 1938, Great Britain granted universal suffrage and internal self-government in 1944, which was expanded to full self-government by 1959. 1958-61 Jamaica belonged to the West Indian Federation, but refused further membership in a referendum in 1961 and opted for full independence within the framework of the Commonwealth of Nations. Under Prime Minister W. Alexander Bustamante (* 1877, † 1977; term of office 1962–67; JLP) Jamaica became independent in 1962. In 1969 Jamaica joined the Organization of American States (OAS). 1972-80 persecuted the government of Michael Manley (* 1924, † 1997; PNP) a socialist-oriented reform program (literacy, land reform, greater economic independence from the USA, Great Britain and Canada by converting bauxite companies into joint ventures with Jamaican majority participation). In terms of foreign policy, there were closer contacts with other Latin American countries, v. a. with Cuba, and for engagement in the movement of the non-aligned in favor of a new world economic order; In 1973 Jamaica was a founding member of the Caribbean Community.

Religion

The constitution guarantees freedom of religion. All religious communities are legally equal. Around 2% belong to the Catholic Church (Archdiocese of Kingston in Jamaica with two suffragan bishops), just under 3% to the Anglican Church (province of the West Indies), 62% to the more than 150 Protestant churches and communities (especially supporters of the Pentecostal movement [about 37%, including Church of God just under 26%], Adventists [12%], Baptists [around 7%]) and Afro-Caribbean churches (revivalists, etc.). The Afro-American religion of the Rastafarians, which originated in Jamaicaare attributed to more than 1% of the population. There are also followers of the magic spell (Obeah) and the strongly ecstatic Afro-American convince cult. Very small religious communities are made up of Hindus, Baha’is, Muslims and Jews. About 21% of the population do not belong to any religious community.