Euromaidan Chronic of Events Part I

By | February 3, 2021

On 21 November 2013, the then Prime Minister Azarov published the amounts authorized by Janukovyč decision on the failure to sign the Association Agreement with the EU in the summit in Vilnius in late November 2013. The rejection of a negotiated over years Agreement is directly related to the strong economic pressure from Moscow. The renunciation of European integration and the rapprochement with Russia proclaimed by the Ukrainian government triggered a strong protest movement. The first demonstrations took place on the Maidan Nezaležnosti (Independence Square) in Kyiv and larger cities of Ukraine on the evening of November 21st and gradually grew across the country. This initially peaceful citizens’ movement was quickly given the name Euromaidan. According to ezinereligion, Ukraine is a country located in Eastern Europe.

On November 24, 2013, the largest demonstration since the Orange Revolution took place in Kyiv, attended by 150,000 people. Numerous student strikes took place in the days leading up to the Vilnius Summit. The opposition, headed by Vitalij Klitschko (Udar Party), Arsenij Jacenjuk (Bat’kivščyna Party) and Oleh Tjahnybok (Svoboda Party), organized rallies on the Maidan and spoke to the protesters every evening. On the night of November 30th to December 1st, 2013, a violent evacuation by the notorious Berkut (golden eagle) special unit of the Ministry of the Interior took place. Around 400 protesters, mostly students, were brutally beaten, rubber sticks and tear gas were used. Several activists, but also passers-by who happened to be on the streets, were arrested. The information about the violence against peaceful demonstrators sparked mass demonstrations in large parts of the country (500,000 people took part in the protest march in Kyiv alone) and spread very quickly via social networks. The opposition politicians established the National Resistance Staff. Protesters occupied the central square of the capital,erected barricades and set up tents and various self-sufficiency points (emergency service, canteen, tea kitchens, etc.). From then on, they occupy the central square in Kyiv and several government and administrative buildings such as the City Hall, the House of Trade Unions, the Ukrainian House, the Ministry of Justice for the whole time of the protests.

On December 3, the Ukrainian parliament failed to pass the vote of no confidence in the Azarov government. Azarov, who was known for his pro-Russian stance and anti-European, racist, homophobic and chauvinist remarks, resigned from the office of prime minister on January 28, 2014.

Results of the parliamentary elections by region - Ukraine

Results of the parliamentary elections by region – Ukraine

On December 4th, the then German Foreign Minister Guido Westerwelle visited the Maidan and announced his solidarity with the protesters.

On December 8, 2013, masked police units stormed the office of the opposition party Bat’kivščyna (Party of Jacenjuk and Tymošenko) and confiscated the server and computer.

The Lenin monument in Kyiv was overthrown and smashed on the same day as the largest peaceful demonstration (“March of the Millions”) against Janukovyč and his corrupt regime. Subsequently, statues of Lenin symbolizing the old regime were dismantled across the country. The protests spread to many cities and regions in Ukraine.

On December 10th, the European Parliament discussed the situation in Ukraine. The EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy Catherine Ashton left for Kyiv.

From December 10th to 11th, violence between the demonstrators and the police, who were supported by hired thugs (titušky), escalated. On December 11th, Janukovyč agreed to a round table with the opposition, which took place the following day, but had no results.

On December 17, Janukovyč traveled to Russia again to meet Putin. The two agreed to cut the price of gas and take out a $ 15 billion loan. In the meantime, more and more protesters have been mobilizing on the Maidan and the surrounding streets and are holding out at temperatures as low as minus 29 degrees. The Euromaidan continued to grow. People came from several regions of Ukraine and stayed in the central square of the capital.

Hundreds of thousands of Ukrainians celebrated their revolution on the Maidan on New Year’s Eve. Those in power tried by all means to discredit the protests, including scare tactics, targeted campaigns in the press such as claims that the Maidan is organized by right-wing extremists only, accusations of anti-Semitism, etc.

On December 29th, the Automaidan movement was formed – a protest march with cars. A motorcade drove towards Mežyhirja – the presidential palace, 25km from Kyiv.

On January 12th, a rally “For order”, organized by those in power, was held, which mainly consisted of young, athletically trained men, known as titušky.

On January 16, 2014, the Verhovna Rada passed anti-democratic laws within 30 minutes with a majority of MPs from the Party of Regions and the Communist Party, which massively restrict the right of opinion, the press and the right to demonstrate. The EU and the US sharply criticized the laws signed by the President on January 17th. The violence in Kyiv escalated. The Berkut units tried again and again to storm the barricades on the Maidan, Molotov cocktails and stones flew. The groups “Samooborona” (self-defense) and “Pravyj sektor” (right sector) defended the barricades. The militia, the Berkut special unit and Titušky abducted people directly from the streets. The injured were kidnapped from the hospitals. On January 21st, two Maidan activists, Ihor Lucenko and Juri Verbyckyj, kidnapped by masked men from the hospital to a forest near Kyiv. The two activists were beaten and tortured. Verbyckyj died and Lucenko survived seriously injured. The protests continued on January 22nd in Hruševskohostrasse. Weapons and a water cannon were used when the temperature was below zero. The paramedics reported five deaths on the Maidan. The US banned some government officials from entering the country, while Russia labeled the protesters “extremists” and blamed them for escalating violence. Weapons and a water cannon were used when the temperature was below zero. The paramedics reported five deaths on the Maidan. The US banned some government officials from entering the country, while Russia labeled the protesters “extremists” and blamed them for escalating violence. Weapons and a water cannon were used when the temperature was below zero. The paramedics reported five deaths on the Maidan. The US banned some government officials from entering the country, while Russia labeled the protesters “extremists” and blamed them for escalating violence.