Ecuador Climate

By | December 14, 2021

The factors that influence the climate of Ecuador, in addition to latitude, are the relief and the cold Current of Peru, which laps the southern coasts of the country and, in front of the Gulf of Guayaquil, divides into two arms, one of which continues towards the N. flowing a short distance from the coasts of the province of Manabí, and the other, the main one, goes towards the Galápagos.

In the coastal region, the climate transitions from the arid one of Peru to the very humid one of southern coastal Colombia. Since the current of Peru acts only in the southern part of the coastal zone, there is a notable difference between the climate of this part, in S. del C. Pasado, and that of the northern part. In the first there are considerably lower temperatures and much less abundant rainfall than in the second: thus the hacienda el Recreo, at 0 ° 27 ′ S. and at 6 m. above the sea, 23 °, 8 ° of average annual temperature, with a maximum of 25 °, 2 (February) and a minimum of 22 °, 4 (October); while Esmeraldas (on the sea, at 1 ° lat. N.) would have 27 ° or 28 °.

While in the southern coastal area the temperature rises from the coast towards the interior (Guayaquil, 40 km. From the mouth of the Guayas, already has an annual average temperature of 25 °, 7), in the northern area from the coast towards the interior it seems that the temperature decreases (22-23 ° of annual average). In the drier southernmost area, the rains generally fall only in a short period of the year (2-3 months: usually February-March) and it seems that they do not exceed 500 mm at any point. of annual average. On the coasts, however, garúas are frequent, very minute rains caused by thick fog. Proceeding towards the N., the precipitations increase: in Guayaquil there is a rainy period (invierno) that goes from December to April or May; further north the invierno it gets longer, until there is no longer a real dry period (verano): it rains all year round and there are few clear days. There is no data on the average amount of rain; but surely it is several meters every year. For Ecuador travel information, please check zipcodesexplorer.com.

The climate of the mountainous region varies according to altitude, and while in the lower valleys or on the western and eastern sides of the Cordillera it is still tropical (Faique, at 840 meters above sea level, on the western side, has an average annual temperature of 22 °, 1, with 23 ° in the hottest month, February, and 21 °, 2 in the coldest month, June; 1400 mm. of rains, distributed throughout the year, with absolute prevalence in the period December-May, in which 90 falls %; El Puyo, at 980 m., On the eastern side of the Cordillera, much rainier, receives about 4000 mm. Of precipitation), on the plateaus between the two Cordillera the climate can be considered warm-temperate, with minimal annual excursions, rains not very abundant and distributed throughout the year, although a rainy and a dry season are distinguished. Quito, at 0 ° 14 ‘of lat. S. and at 2850 meters above sea level, it has an average annual temperature of 12 °, 6 (average of the hottest month, February, 12 °, 8; of the coldest month, November, 12 °, 4), 1120 mm. of annual rainfall (85% from October to May) and 159 rainy days. In Ambato, at about 1 ° 15 ′ S., at 2620 msm, there are 13 °, 9 of average annual temperature (14 °, 7 in November, 12 °, 5 in July and August), and no more than 500 mm.. of precipitation (prevalent from October to May). Almost nothing is known about the climate of the other places. From the rather mild climate of the highlands located up to 3000 m. we then move on to the so-called climate of there are 13 °, 9 ° of average annual temperature (14 °, 7 in November, 12 °, 5 in July and August), and no more than 500 mm.. of precipitation (prevalent from October to May). Almost nothing is known about the climate of the other places. From the rather mild climate of the highlands located up to 3000 m. we then move on to the so-called climate of there are 13 °, 9 ° of average annual temperature (14 °, 7 in November, 12 °, 5 in July and August), and no more than 500 mm.. of precipitation (prevalent from October to May). Almost nothing is known about the climate of the other places. From the rather mild climate of the highlands located up to 3000 m. we then move on to the so-called climate of páramos, located beyond the limit of the arboreal vegetation, a climate characterized by a great variability of the time. Generally the temperature remains low, and often drops below freezing; rainfall is abundant and often falls in the form of snow and hail; fogs are frequent. In Hato de Antisana, at 0 ° 21 ‘of lat. S., at 4095 m., The average annual temperature is 5 ° (6 ° in January, 3 °, 3 in August). The permanent snow limit is 4650-4700 m.

Very little is known precisely about the climate of the East, where there are high temperatures with very small annual excursions, abundant rainfall (perhaps above 2000 mm.) And at any time of the year.

Geography. – The Ecuadorian rivers originate mostly in the Cordillera region, and some are also fed by the small glaciers of the higher volcanoes; since in general the precipitations in the country are abundant, they are usually rich in water and navigable in their lower course, although they cannot have much development due to the proximity of the mountains to the coast. Ecuador sends its waters partly to the Pacific and partly to the Atlantic, via the Amazon River. On the Pacific side the most important rivers are the Daule and the Babahoyo, which together with other minor watercourses (Caracol, Vinces, etc.) form the Guayas, on the right bank of which, at a point where the river navigation meets the maritime one, Guayaquil is built. The Guayas in front of Guayaquil is about 2 km wide. and deep enough to be navigated even by steamships of considerable tonnage in the period of high tide. According to the Wolf, the Guayas basin is about 34,500 sq km wide. South of the Guayas are the Río de Naranjal, which is navigable to pict. steam up to La Revesa, and the Río Túmbez, which partly marks the border with Peru. From the Guayas going up towards the N. up to Esmeraldas there are only short rivers (because they flow down from the western slopes of the coastal hills) and, above all in the southern part, which is arid, not very rich in water. The Río de Esmeraldas flows into Esmeraldas, formed by the Río Blanco and the Guallabamba; it is very rich in waters, because it crosses a region with abundant rains, and is navigable for a good distance; in importance it is the second largest river in Ecuador (21,000 sq. km. of basin). At the border with Colombia, the Río Mira flows into a marshy delta. The eastern flat area is bathed by some tributaries of the Amazon River (Coca, Napo, Curaray, Pastaza, Morona, Santiago) whose course is still little known. They all usually have a NO.-SE direction, and after leaving the mountainous region, where their sources are located, they cross the East with a slow course and for long navigable stretches, given the wealth of water. There are numerous lake basins in the Andean region, mostly of modest size. and after leaving the mountainous region, in which their sources are located, they cross the East with a slow course and for long navigable stretches, given the wealth of waters. There are numerous lake basins in the Andean region, mostly of modest size. and after leaving the mountainous region, in which their sources are located, they cross the East with a slow course and for long navigable stretches, given the wealth of waters. There are numerous lake basins in the Andean region, mostly of modest size.

Ecuador Climate