Cuba to the Left of the Left

By | December 9, 2021

Cuban diplomacy is one of the most active in the world. Havana, in the 1960s and 1970s, supported the guerrillas in many countries of Central America (El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua) and South America (Colombia, Venezuela, Bolivia, Argentina). Its Armed Forces have participated in campaigns all over the world, including large-scale ones, in particular in the wars in Ethiopia and Angola. The Cuban intervention, which resulted in the defeat of the chosen divisions of the Republic of South Africa, has certainly accelerated the independence process of Namibia and the fall of the racist apartheid regime and allowed the liberation of Nelson Mandela, who never misses an opportunity to remember his friendship with Fidel Castro and the debt to the Cuban revolution. In the 1980s, Cuba led the non-aligned front and led an intense campaign to cancel the debt of Latin American countries. After the collapse of the socialist regime in Europe and the end of the Soviet Union in 1991, the Cuban revolution experienced difficult years, but managed to survive, much to the surprise of its opponents. Since then, for the first time in its history, Cuba no longer depends on any empire, neither Spain, nor the United States, nor the USSR. He embarked on a new political path, to the left of the international left, leading the vast offensive against neoliberalism and economic globalization. but she managed to survive, to the surprise of her opponents. Since then, for the first time in its history, Cuba no longer depends on any empire, neither Spain, nor the United States, nor the USSR. He embarked on a new political path, to the left of the international left, leading the vast offensive against neoliberalism and economic globalization. but she managed to survive, to the surprise of her opponents. Since then, for the first time in its history, Cuba no longer depends on any empire, neither Spain, nor the United States, nor the USSR. He embarked on a new political path, to the left of the international left, leading the vast offensive against neoliberalism and economic globalization. For Cuba political system, please check diseaseslearning.com.

In this new geopolitical context, the Cuban revolution remains, thanks to its successes and despite its serious shortcomings (economic difficulties, food shortages, great bureaucratic incompetence, small generalized corruption, hard daily life, rationing, restriction of some freedoms) important reference for many developing countries. In many parts of the world men and women struggle and die to get some of the acquired rights of the Cuban model.

This is particularly true in Latin America, where solidarity with Cuba and esteem for the figure of Fidel Castro are particularly strong. After the victory of Hugo Chávez in Venezuela in 1998, democratic consultations led to the election or re-election of leftist candidates in many states: Néstor Kirchner and Cristina Fernández de Kirchner in Argentina, Ignacio Lula da Silva in Brazil, Tabaré Vasquez in Uruguay, René Préval in Haiti, Michelle Bachelet in Chile, Evo Morales in Bolivia, Daniel Ortega in Nicaragua, Rafael Correa in Ecuador and Fernando Lugo in Paraguay. This situation is entirely new in Latin America, where until recently military coups (the most recent, that of April 2002 against Chávez) or the direct military intervention of the United States (the last against President Manuel Noriega in Panama in 1989) had put an end to any project of economic and social reform, even if desired by local voters. In that geopolitical context, the only left experience that managed to survive was the Cuban one. The price was high. The pressures forced it to tense up more than necessary and, to escape the political and economic isolation propitiated by the United States, to favor for more than twenty years an unnatural alliance with the distant Soviet Union, whose sudden disappearance, in the 1991 led to great difficulties. What has changed now? Certainly, starting with the 1991 Gulf War, the United States has shifted its attention to the Middle East, where its main current enemies are located (Al Qaeda, the Taliban, Iran). This change of perspectives has undoubtedly favored the flourishing, in Latin America, of the many political experiences of the left and has prevented them from being stifled in the bud. A great opportunity for Havana, which has seen an increase in the number of its allies on the continent (Venezuela, Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, Bolivia, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Paraguay), with which it has multiplied political, economic and commercial agreements.

Cuba to the Left of the Left