List of Community Colleges in South Dakota

By | March 1, 2019

How many community colleges in South Dakota? There are a total of 5 two-year, public community colleges and trade schools located throughout the state of South Dakota. For each school, you can see its contact information, academic calendar, campus environment, and number of students enrolled. Schools in South Dakota are listed alphabetically.

Lake Area Technical Institute

Address: 230 11th St NE, Watertown, SD 57201
Phone Number: (605) 882-5284
President: Debra Shephard
Type of School: Public, 2-Year
Academic Calendar: Semester
Degree Offered: Associate’s Degree
Campus Settings: Remote Town
Number of Students: 1,090
Abbreviation: LATI/Lake Area Tech

Lake Area Technical Institute

Mitchell Technical Institute

Address: 821 N Capital St, Mitchell, SD 57301
Phone Number: (605) 995-3023
President: Greg Von Wald
Type of School: Public, 2-Year
Academic Calendar: Semester
Degree Offered: Associate’s Degree
Campus Settings: Remote Town
Number of Students: 755

Mitchell Technical Institute

Sisseton Wahpeton College

Address: BIA Rd 700, Agency Village, SD 57262
Phone Number: (605) 698-3966 x1100
President: Diana Canku
Type of School: Public, 2-Year
Academic Calendar: Semester
Degree Offered: Associate’s Degree
Campus Settings: Rural
Number of Students: 245

Sisseton Wahpeton College

Southeast Technical Institute

Address: 2320 N Career Ave, Sioux Falls, SD 57107
Phone Number: (605) 367-7624
President: Jeff Holcomb
Type of School: Public, 2-Year
Academic Calendar: Semester
Degree Offered: Associate’s Degree
Campus Settings: Rural Fringe
Number of Students: 2,201

Western Dakota Technical Institute

Address: 800 Mickelson Dr, Rapid City, SD 57703
Phone Number: (605) 394-4034
President: Dr. Craig Bailey
Type of School: Public, 2-Year
Academic Calendar: Semester
Degree Offered: Associate’s Degree
Campus Settings: Rural Fringe
Number of Students: 1,036

American football history

Ball games have been known in the North American colonies since the time of the settlers in Jamestown, but they really became popular in the United States (especially among students) in the middle of the 19th century. Football was then played with practically no rules, so many athletes were injured, it is not surprising that in the early sixties such entertainment was banned at Yale and Harvard. Nevertheless, the game continued to develop and in 1862 in Boston, Massachusetts, the first sports club appeared (Oneida Football Club), whose members played the “Boston game” (“Boston game”) – a kind of “hybrid” of modern rugby, American and European football.

At the end of the decade, football returned to American universities, and on November 6, 1869, the first “intercollegiate” game between Princeton and Rutgers took place in New Jersey. On October 20, 1873, representatives from Yale, Columbia, Princeton, and Rutgers met in New York City to discuss football rules. The agreement they reached made the “ball game” more like European football, while the students at Harvard University who withdrew from the New York conference continued to develop the “Boston game” more like rugby. The “Massachusetts” version turned out to be more popular and already in November 1876, representatives of Harvard, Yale, Princeton and Columbia agreed on a new code of rules,

Walter Kemp is called the “Father of American Football”. As an outstanding athlete (and later coach), he introduced a number of significant innovations that made American football much closer to what we see it today. Among Kemp’s most important ideas are reducing the number of players per team from fifteen to eleven (which made the game more dynamic); rules of “downs” and “safety”; standard offensive and defensive formations of football players etc. During his life, Walter Kemp wrote about 30 books and more than 250 magazine articles on the development of sports and football in particular.