List of Community Colleges in Idaho

By | March 1, 2019

According to ezinesports, Idaho is a beautiful and diverse state located in the northwestern region of the United States. It’s known for its stunning natural landscapes, including majestic mountains, deep canyons, and vast plains. Idaho is home to some of the country’s most spectacular outdoor recreation areas, including Yellowstone National Park, Craters of the Moon National Monument, and Hells Canyon National Recreation Area. The state also offers a variety of cultural attractions like museums, art galleries, and theaters. According to fashionissupreme, Idaho’s economy is driven by agriculture, tourism, technology, and manufacturing. The capital city of Boise is a vibrant hub for business and entertainment.

How many community colleges in Idaho? There are a total of 3 two-year, public community colleges and trade schools located throughout the state of Idaho. For each school, you can see its contact information, academic calendar, campus environment, and number of students enrolled. Schools in Idaho are listed alphabetically.

College of Southern Idaho

Address: 315 Falls Ave., Twin Falls, ID 83301
Phone Number: (208) 733-9554
President: Jerry Beck
Type of School: Public, 2-Year
Academic Calendar: Semester
Degree Offered: Associate’s Degree
Campus Settings: Remote Town
Number of Students: 7,118
Abbreviation: CSI

College of Southern Idaho

Eastern Idaho Technical College

Address: 1600 S 25th E, Idaho Falls, ID 83404
Phone Number: (208) 524-3000 x3371
President: Burton Waite
Type of School: Public, 2-Year
Academic Calendar: Semester
Degree Offered: Associate’s Degree
Campus Settings: Small City
Number of Students: 762
Abbreviation: EITC

Eastern Idaho Technical College

North Idaho College

Address: 1000 West Garden Avenue, Coeur D’alene, ID 83814
Phone Number: (208) 769-3300
President: Priscilla Bell
Type of School: Public, 2-Year
Academic Calendar: Semester
Degree Offered: Associate’s Degree
Campus Settings: Small City
Number of Students: 4,650
Abbreviation: NIC

Yellowstone National Park

Similarly, over the next few decades, the stories of hunters who visited the Yellowstone area about lakes of boiling mud, smoking rivers and petrified trees were treated with distrust over the next several decades. Among others, hunter and explorer Jim Bridger visited Yellowstone in 1856. Just like Colter, Bridger, with his stories of fountains of hot water and steam gushing out of the ground, was considered an inventor.

After the end of the Civil War, the Yellowstone area was explored first by private individuals (in 1869) and then by US government -funded (in 1871) expeditions. The 1871 expedition was led by the American geologist and naturalist Ferdinand Hayden. Hayden’s detailed report on Yellowstone, illustrated with photographs by William Jackson and paintings by Thomas Moran, convinced the US Congress to pass legislation creating Yellowstone National Park, the first US national park. This law was signed into law by the eighteenth President of the United States, Ulysses Grant, on March 1, 1872.

Nathaniel Langford was appointed as the first director of Yellowstone Park. At first, the government didn’t finance the park, didn’t even pay the director’s salary. The situation changed for the better only a few years later, after the report of Colonel William Ludlow, under whose leadership the study of the natural wonders of the new reserve continued in the second half of the seventies of the century before last.

Interest in the park and the number of its visitors increased dramatically in the 1880s, when tourists were able to come to southern Montana (from where it was relatively easy to get to the Yellowstone area) via the newly built Northern Pacific Railroad.

In the late eighties, the Indians who lived there were actually expelled from the park, at the same time a US Army fort was built here, which made it possible to stop poaching and protect unique natural resources.

In the future, Yellowstone National Park has successfully developed, keeping intact the unique natural sites and at the same time creating new amenities for tourists.

Most of the park is located on the Yellowstone Plateau, the average height of which is about 2,400 meters above sea level, and the highest point of the plateau (but not the entire reserve) is Mount Washburn, 3,122 meters. The plateau is surrounded by the ranges of the Rocky Mountains: Gallatin to the northwest, Birthut to the north, Absaroka to the east, Teton to the south, and Madison to the southwest and west.