Chile History From 1964 to 1974 Part II

By | December 13, 2021

It was then observed that “the old oligarchic and pro-imperialist reaction had seen the realization of its eternal nightmare: the irruption of the working class into the ministries”. Allende’s program was well-known and centered on nationalizations, on replacing the bicameral Congress with a People’s Assembly, on expropriations of large haciendas. in favor of peasant cooperatives, in addition to the expected resumption of relations with the government of F. Castro. Panic spread among many landowners, who hoarded dollars and moved abroad; with the flight of capital there was a drain of “brains” and technicians, while the harvests were postponed and construction activity was reduced. Allende’s debut took place in an alarmist atmosphere and strewn with objective difficulties that made his mandate problematic. The Church proved willing to support the new government, whose program coincided in part with the social reforms it itself advocated. The armed forces, traditionally alien to politics, appeared in favor of the new regime, especially after the acceptance of some of their claims and the assassination of General R. Schneider,

Allende’s experiment on a broad political basis was followed closely abroad even though his detractors skeptically called it “Chilean sauce”. The government was determined to put an end to the centuries-old misery of the peasantry and to prevent foreign capital from continuing to exploit the immense natural wealth of the country. The local elections of April 4, 1971 reconfirmed the people’s trust in Allende, who obtained a clear victory. But in the following month of June Frei’s former interior minister, E. Pérez Zucovic, hated by the left, was assassinated; in the Chambers, Allende’s initiatives were conditioned by the votes of the Christian Democrats who soon passed to the opposition. The governing coalition began to falter, also due to the pressure of the radicals who demanded drastic solutions. In November he stayed for a long time in Chile Fidel Castro, who expressed his solidarity with Allende in torrential speeches to the masses. The opposition organized hostile demonstrations that were inspired by the unstoppable rise in prices; People’s China, to make up for the lack of US funding, granted Allende a loan (February 9, 1972) which allowed him to improve wages; the expropriation of the ITT (to make up for the lack of US funding, he granted Allende a loan (February 9, 1972) which allowed him to improve wages; the expropriation of the ITT (to make up for the lack of US funding, he granted Allende a loan (February 9, 1972) which allowed him to improve wages; the expropriation of the ITT (International Telephon and Telegraph), a powerful multinational corporation, followed by the documented accusation of having set aside a million dollars to overthrow the regime, caused a major scandal and an investigation by the Washington Senate. Meanwhile, the economic horizon was darkening: the price of copper fell; agricultural production, due to hasty agrarian reform and drought, fell rapidly, depriving the cities of supplies; the cattle, finding no place in the newly formed small farms, were almost all slaughtered. Allende tried by all means to stem the rising tide. In foreign policy he established relations not only with China and Cuba, but also with North Vietnam, North Korea and with all the countries of the Soviet bloc. He visited neighboring Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, Mexico, Cuba and Argentina where he resolved, with President Lanusse, the old Beagle Channel issue. He then went to Moscow (6-9 December) on an official visit.

The food situation in the country had become critical. The scarcity of food in the shops led women to take to the streets to protest. The legal expropriations of land were joined by illegal ones, promoted by extremists who resorted to violence. An unprecedented wave of strikes – more or less exploited – hit the country. Street demonstrations multiplied and acts of terrorism spread panic. Allende to free himself from the grip of the radicals, in an extreme attempt to stem the disorders that threatened chaos, resorted to the military (November 3) by inserting them into the government structure. The prestigious general Chile Prats, chief of staff of the army, was entrusted with the ministry of Internal while Rear Admiral Ismael Huerta went to Public Works and Carabinieri General Chile Sapúlveda to mining affairs. The new cabinet did not appeal to the left, who accused Allende of betraying radical reformism; but the president was able to revoke the state of emergency already decreed and reassure the small and middle bourgeoisie. On December 4, 1972, Allende, speaking at the XXVII session of the UN General Assembly, issued a vibrant indictment against imperialism, which “by brutal suffocation of the Chilean economy” sought to overthrow his government in order to establish a dictatorship.. but the president was able to revoke the state of emergency already decreed and reassure the small and middle bourgeoisie. On December 4, 1972, Allende, speaking at the XXVII session of the UN General Assembly, issued a vibrant indictment against imperialism, which “by brutal suffocation of the Chilean economy” sought to overthrow his government in order to establish a dictatorship.. but the president was able to revoke the state of emergency already decreed and reassure the small and middle bourgeoisie. On December 4, 1972, Allende, speaking at the XXVII session of the UN General Assembly, issued a vibrant indictment against imperialism, which “by brutal suffocation of the Chilean economy” sought to overthrow his government in order to establish a dictatorship.

Chile History From 1964 to 1974 Part II