Canada Commerce and Population

By | December 25, 2021

Commerce. – For the importance of foreign trade, Canada now occupies the second place among the English Dominions (after India); the relationship between import and export, which closed before the war in imbalance (average for the five-year period 1909-13: import 528.8; export 326.8), reversed after 1921, although the first a few years to rise (average of the five-year period 1924-28: import 951.5, export 1197.4).

The strong increase in exports coincides with the development of agriculture: the products of this, with the timber and derivatives, alone account for about half the value of exports (3 cereals and flour, 7 wood), while 6 is constituted by raw products and processed livestock and fishing, 6 from the minerals and the rest by several artifacts, including before the paper. Of imports, the highest figures are for iron and steel products (especially cars), coal, oil, sugar, rubber articles, silk factories, cottons, wools, etc.

As for the countries with which Canada trades, the most notable fact is the progressive (relative) decrease in exchanges with the mother country. While in 1900 England alone absorbed 56.6% of this trade, in 1926-27 the percentage was reduced to 27%. The place of the mother country is currently taken by the United States, which accounts for 57% of the total value of Canadian exchanges; the parable can be summarized by the following figures, relating to imports:

Of the other countries, the main relations are with Japan, Germany, France, Holland, Cuba and the other English colonies of North America. The table below gives the value of imports and exports in thousands of dollars for 1926-27.

As for Italy, while exports to Canada – essentially consisting of manufactured goods (especially of the textile industry) – maintain their relative importance in the overall picture of our trade balance, with very low values ​​(0.3%; for 41, 6 million lire, on average, in the period 1925-27), exports, for almost all wheat (510 thousand tons in 1927), gradually increased after the war (from 0.4% to 2.5% of total Italian import trade), up to a value of over half a billion lire, on average, in the period 1925-27.

The participation of the various ports in Canadian foreign trade is clarified by this table (the value is given in thousands of dollars).

It should be noted, however, that these figures give a very incomplete idea of ​​the actual conditions of Canadian traffic: thus, for example, about 50% of the grain trade finds its outlet through the United States due to a lack of river connections between the Canadian region. prairies (Winnipeg) and S. Lorenzo, and for the long period in which this is closed to navigation by the ice.

Population distributiondensitybuilt-up areas. – The great extension of the uninhabited and uninhabitable territories, and the recent populating of most of the Dominion make the density figures still very low: just over one resident per sq. Km, compared to 15 in the United States (without Alaska) and 7.5 from Mexico (1930). The population is almost entirely concentrated along the southern borders; its distribution, rather than with temperature, is related to rainfall, the most important climatic factor for agricultural regions, especially in the O. Surfaces with densities ranging from 1 to 10 residents per sq km (8% of the total area) they form a strip from the Atlantic to Manitoba parallel to the border with the United States, tapering towards the West, where around 111 ° is a large arid zone, which continues the huge expanse of still sparsely populated territories that is to the north, which includes the same plains more favorable to the settlement of the Whites of British Columbia (Upper Columbia and Middle Fraser). The regions between Georgian Bay, Erie and the middle San Lorenzo (1.3% of the total area) show densities ranging between 10 and 50 residents per sq. km., with limited districts in which the density is even greater; but almost all of the Dominion (91.7%) has extremely low values, for a large part of the territory destined to vary, in substance, perhaps slightly. Lorenzo (1.3% of the total area) show densities ranging between 10 and 50 residents per sq. km., with limited districts in which the density is even greater; but almost all of the Dominion (91.7%) has extremely low values, for a large part of the territory destined to vary, in substance, perhaps slightly. Lorenzo (1.3% of the total area) show densities ranging between 10 and 50 residents per sq. km, with limited districts in which the density is even greater; but almost all of the Dominion (91.7%) has extremely low values, for a large part of the territory destined to vary, in substance, perhaps slightly. For Canada religion and languages, please check ezinereligion.com.

As in the United States, the city population has been growing in Canada at a faster rate than the rural one, although the enormous urban agglomerations characteristic of the finite republic could not be created here, even where they were more favorable, as in Quebec and above all in southern Ontario, the conditions for the development of “sprawling cities”. Currently, the Dominion has seven large cities (with a population of more than 100,000 residents), two of which (Toronto and Montreal) with over half a million residents, Representing all together more than 1 / 5of the total population (23.8%); five between 50 and 100 thousand residents with 3.1% of the population itself and about fifteen over 20 thousand residents (4.5%); means that in the complex urban population is around 3 of the total, without taking account of which lives concentrated in smaller centers, destined sooner or later to take on the characteristics of a city more clearly. The major agglomerations are mostly arranged along the great natural communication routes (Lakes, S. Lorenzo) and in the eastern regions, three are inland centers (prairie area: Winnipeg, Calgary, Edmonton), only one is on the Pacific (Vancouver), where the particular morphological (relief), climatic (rainfall), and economic (poor commercial development) conditions have so far prevented a denser settlement of population.

The following table shows the population increase in Canadian cities over 50,000 residents for the period 1871-1930 (the figures are given in thousands of residents).

The different origins of agricultural colonization in E. (FrancoCanadesi) and in O. (recent immigration) find a well-defined correspondence in the different characters of the locations. Where these were chosen, as in the early days of European penetration, especially in view of military (strong), commercial or religious (missions) opportunities, more or less large rural villages (and then cities) developed, while the population of the prairies appears essentially determined by the course of the railways, along which ribbons of inhabited areas of various depths stretch, beyond which colonization becomes more sparse or ceases entirely. The areas where the influx of the English element was strongest are characterized by a much higher percentage of scattered population, in correspondence with the prevalence of farms, in which the farmhouse, at the center of the farm, forms, also from a topographical point of view, an independent unit. The great majority of the houses are inhabited by single families, with the average number of residents per house falling from 5.33 to 4.63 in the last forty years.

About 4 of these houses are wooden and most of the remaining bricks. More than 75% of the rural and about 50% of the urban ones belong to those who live there.

Canada religion and languages