Best Medical Schools in Pennsylvania

By | April 29, 2018

Welcome to Pennsylvania best medical schools. Our rankings are based on alumni reviews, research scores received, peer institution assessment and admissions statistics including averaged MCAT scores, undergraduate GPA as well as acceptance rates. Below we list top medical schools in Pennsylvania that are top ranked nationally. You can find tuition cost, total enrollment and composite MCAT score for each school.

  • TIMEDICTIONARY: Overview of major cities and towns in Pennsylvania. Includes history, population and geographical map of Pennsylvania.

Best Medical Schools in Pennsylvania

National Ranking Best Medical Programs
3 University of Pennsylvania (Perelman) (Philadelphia, PA)
Acceptance rate: 5.1%
MCAT composite score: 12.3
Tuition: Full-time: $45,498
Average undergraduate GPA: 3.82
Total medical school enrollment: 636
Full-time faculty-student ratio: 3.9:1
NIH funds granted to medical school and affiliated hospitals (in millions): $533.6

University of Pennsylvania Medical School

15 University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA)
Acceptance rate: 7.1%
MCAT composite score: 11.7
Tuition: Full-time: $43,424 (in-state), Full-time: $44,512 (out-of-state)
Average undergraduate GPA: 3.75
Total medical school enrollment: 604
Full-time faculty-student ratio: 3.6:1
NIH funds granted to medical school and affiliated hospitals (in millions): $368.2University of Pittsburgh Medical School
47 Temple University (Philadelphia, PA)
Acceptance rate: 5.3%
MCAT composite score: 10.5
Tuition: Full-time: $53,468
Average undergraduate GPA: 3.64
Total medical school enrollment: 778
Full-time faculty-student ratio: 0.6:1
NIH funds granted to medical school and affiliated hospitals (in millions): $125.7Temple University Medical School
57 Jefferson Medical College (Philadelphia, PA)
Acceptance rate: 4.7%
MCAT composite score: 10.7
Tuition: Full-time: $48,733
Average undergraduate GPA: 3.67
Total medical school enrollment: 1,054
Full-time faculty-student ratio: 2.4:1
NIH funds granted to medical school and affiliated hospitals (in millions): $73.8

Jefferson Medical College

86 Drexel University (Philadelphia, PA)
Acceptance rate: 5.2%
MCAT composite score: 10.0
Tuition: Full-time: $46,810
Average undergraduate GPA: 3.55
Total medical school enrollment: 1,080
Full-time faculty-student ratio: 0.6:1
NIH funds granted to medical school and affiliated hospitals (in millions): $30.4

Drexel University Medical School

95 Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine (Erie, PA)
Acceptance rate: 7.8%
MCAT composite score: 9.1
Tuition: Full-time: $29,673
Average undergraduate GPA: 3.43
Total medical school enrollment: 2,016
Full-time faculty-student ratio: 0.5:1
NIH funds granted to medical school and affiliated hospitals (in millions): $0.0

Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine

Liberty Bell

The Liberty Bell is an ancient bell in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, one of the most famous symbols of the United States. According to legend, it was his ringing that informed the residents of the city about the signing of the Declaration of Independence of the United States of America.

The bell was cast in bronze in 1752, it weighs 2080 pounds (a little over 940 kg), is 3 feet 2 inches (almost a meter) high, has a base circumference of 12 feet (3.67 m, diameter is 1.17 meters), thickness – from 1.25 to 3 inches (3.2 – 7.6 cm). The inscription on the bell reads: PROCLAIM LIBERTY THROUGHOUT ALL THE LAND UNTO ALL THE RESIDENTS THEREOF-LEV. XXV X/ BY ORDER OF THE ASSEMBLY OF THE PROVINCE OF PENSYLVANIA FOR THE STATE HOUSE IN PHILADa.

From the moment Philadelphia was founded in 1682, the bell ringing alerted the residents of the then small city of various important events. For decades, the bell hung from a tree near the Legislative Assembly, but in the early 1850s, as the new State House (now known as Independence Hall) was being completed, the authorities decided to order a new bell that could be heard in all directions. the rapidly growing capital of the colony. Its manufacture was entrusted to the well-known London firm Whitechapel Bell Foundry, and already in August 1752 it was delivered on the merchant ship Hibernia to Philadelphia.

Despite the fact that the bell was delivered from England to America intact, at the first attempt to ring it, it broke. Customers tried to return the bell to London, but the captain refused to take it back. Then local artisans, John Pass and John Stowe, got down to business, who, after one unsuccessful attempt, nevertheless managed to pick up the composition of the alloy and re-cast the “main” bell of Pennsylvania. Finally, in June 1753, the work was completed and the bell was hung on the belfry of the state residence building.

From that moment on, the bell of Pass and Stowe gathered the legislators of the colony to meetings and notified the residents of the city about the holding of meetings or the announcement of any important announcements. Most likely, in reality, he did not ring on July 4, 1776, and even if he did call four days later, on July 8, on the day of the announcement of the Declaration of Independence, then along with other Philadelphia bells.

Nevertheless, even then the bell was considered a very valuable property, and in September 1777, when Philadelphia was threatened by British troops during the American Revolutionary War, the bell was removed and transported to Allentown under guard. He returned back after the end of the occupation of the city in June 1778, but due to the need to repair the bell tower, it was installed on the top floor of Independence Hall only in 1785.

Over the following decades, the State House Bell was traditionally rung on Independence Day, George Washington’s birthday, election days, and on several other occasions. It is not known exactly when the bell was damaged again, but most likely it happened in the first half of the forties of the XIX century. In February 1846, the Philadelphia newspaper Public Ledger described the bell as “long broken but repaired”, yet the crack continued to grow and has not been rung since.

The bell, as a symbol of emancipation, became popular among American abolitionists in the 1930s. The Philadelphia bell was first called the “Liberty Bell” in 1835, thanks to an article in the journal of the Anti-Slavery Society of New York (probably in connection with the inscription on it). The name quickly became popular.

The Philadelphia bell became nationally famous with the publication on January 2, 1847, by the Saturday Review of George Lippard’s short story “The Fourth of July, 1776”. This is the story of how an elderly bell ringer, who learned about the decision of the delegates of the Second Continental Congress to declare the independence of the American colonies from Great Britain, rang the bell. The story was reprinted many times, and very soon this fictional story was accepted by most Americans as historical fact, thus closely linking the Liberty Bell to the independence of the United States.