Best Medical Schools in Florida

By | April 29, 2018

Welcome to Florida best medical schools. Our rankings are based on alumni reviews, research scores received, peer institution assessment and admissions statistics including averaged MCAT scores, undergraduate GPA as well as acceptance rates. Below we list top medical schools in Florida that are top ranked nationally. You can find tuition cost, total enrollment and composite MCAT score for each school.

  • TIMEDICTIONARY: Overview of major cities and towns in Florida. Includes history, population and geographical map of Florida.

Best Medical Schools in Florida

National Ranking Best Medical Programs
50 University of Florida (Gainesville, FL)
Acceptance rate: 8.1%
MCAT composite score: 10.4
Tuition: Full-time: $30,276 (in-state), Full-time: $59,516 (out-of-state)
Average undergraduate GPA: 3.77
Total medical school enrollment: 546
Full-time faculty-student ratio: 2.3:1
NIH funds granted to medical school and affiliated hospitals (in millions): $117.3University of Florida Medical School
54 University of Miami (Miller) (Miami, FL)
Acceptance rate: 5.4%
MCAT composite score: 10.4
Tuition: Full-time: $39,659
Average undergraduate GPA: 3.72
Total medical school enrollment: 742
Full-time faculty-student ratio: 2.0:1
NIH funds granted to medical school and affiliated hospitals (in millions): $111.6

University of Miami Medical School

76 University of South Florida (Tampa, FL)
Acceptance rate: 9.2%
MCAT composite score: 10.1
Tuition: Full-time: $27,013 (in-state), Full-time: $56,472 (out-of-state)
Average undergraduate GPA: 3.70
Total medical school enrollment: 498
Full-time faculty-student ratio: 2.1:1
NIH funds granted to medical school and affiliated hospitals (in millions): $91.0

University of South Florida Medical School

94 Florida State University (Tallahassee, FL)
Acceptance rate: 8.1%
MCAT composite score: 9.3
Tuition: Full-time: $23,043 (in-state), Full-time: $68,619 (out-of-state)
Average undergraduate GPA: 3.70
Total medical school enrollment: 475
Full-time faculty-student ratio: 0.3:1
NIH funds granted to medical school and affiliated hospitals (in millions):

Florida State University Medical School

101 Nova Southeastern University (Fort Lauderdale, FL)
Acceptance rate: 10.2%
MCAT composite score: 9.4
Tuition: Full-time: $44,545
Average undergraduate GPA: 3.46
Total medical school enrollment: 970
Full-time faculty-student ratio: 0.1:1
NIH funds granted to medical school and affiliated hospitals (in millions): $0.9

Nova Southeastern University Medical School

Florida Early History

Although Juan Ponce de León was the king’s first explorer of Florida, it is likely that other Spaniards had already visited the peninsula before him. Most likely they sailed from the islands of the Caribbean in order to capture slaves. Ponce de Leon’s expedition encountered hostility from the Indians, and some of them knew a few Spanish words.

In subsequent years, the Spaniards continued to explore Florida, in 1521 Ponce de Leon tried to establish a permanent settlement here, but because of the constant attacks of the Indians, his plan ended in failure. It was from Florida, led by the famous Spanish pioneer Hernando de Soto, that the expedition set off, which passed in 1539-40 through the territory of the modern states of Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Tennessee, Alabama and Mississippi. In 1559, Tristan de Luna y Arellano arrived from Mexico to Florida with five hundred soldiers and a thousand civilian settlers and founded a new colony on the site of the modern city of Pensacola. Due to the strongest hurricane that sank ships with supplies, the colonists immediately had serious problems with food, and already in 1561 the Spaniards left the settlement.

In the second half of the 16th century, the French also began to show interest in Florida. In 1562, an expedition led by Jean Ribot explored the northeast coast of Florida near the mouth of the St. Johns River. In 1564, it was here, on the site of modern Jacksonville, that René Goulain de Laudonnière founded Fort Caroline, the first French colony in the United States.

Already in 1565, the Spaniards built their fortified point near Fort Caroline – Fort San Agustin (the city of St. Augustine grew out of it, the oldest of all cities in the USA). Spanish soldiers led by Admiral Pedro Menendez de Aviles captured Fort Caroline and massacred almost all of its residents. The cruelty of the Spaniards was also due to religious motives, they professed Catholicism, and the French colonists were Huguenots (Protestants).

In the 17th century, the Spaniards continued to develop Florida, founding new settlements (mostly Catholic missions) and suppressing the occasional uprisings of the Indians. At the end of the 17th – the first half of the 18th centuries, the pressure of the English colonists from the province of Carolina increased from the north on the Spanish possessions, and from the northwest – the French from Louisiana. So, in 1702 – 1704, the governor of the colony of South Carolina James Moore organized several raids, during which English soldiers, in alliance with the Creek Indians, destroyed almost all Spanish missions in Florida and burned the city of San Agustin. At the same time, most of the Florida Indians who supported the Spaniards were killed or captured into slavery. In 1719, the French captured the Spanish settlement of Pensacola, which had been founded by the Spanish in northwest Florida in 1698. As a result of these and many other armed clashes, the Spanish positions on the Florida peninsula were seriously weakened, and the Creek Indians, who later became known as the Seminoles, began migrating to the deserted lands from the north.

In 1763, after the end of the Seven Years’ War (known in the US as the “French and Indian War”), Spain ceded Florida to Great Britain. At the same time, the British also received part of the French North American colony of Louisiana, located east of the Mississippi River. Two new British colonies were formed, separated by the Apalachicola River: West Florida (which partially included the lands of the modern states of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and northwest Florida) and East Florida (the lands of the Florida peninsula that previously belonged to the Spaniards). During the Revolution and the American Revolutionary War, Britain retained control of East Florida while West Florida was taken over by the Spanish. In 1783, after the end of the war, Spain regained possession of the lands of East Florida, while the border with the United States was agreed upon after lengthy negotiations only in 1795.