Best Law Schools in Virginia

By | March 1, 2019

Are you pursing a law degree? The TopSchoolsintheUSA.com has generated the latest ranking of best law schools in Virginia that provides Master of Legal Studies (MLS), Master of Dispute Resolution (MDR), Juris Doctor (JD), Master of Laws (LLM), or Doctor of Juridical Science (SJD). You can use the following list to pick a school that fits your needs. These law schools in Virginia are ranked based on the student reviews, alumni surveys, assessment of peer institutions, and official data reported by each law college. In addition, we also provide average LSAT scores, GPA and acceptance rates for each of these law schools in Virginia.

  • A2ZCAMERABLOG: General information about Virginia, including state capital, major cities and counties, geography, history, and population statistics of Virginia.

Best Law Schools in Virginia

National Ranking Best Law Programs
9 University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA)
Acceptance rate: 9.3%
LSAT scores (25th-75th percentile): 165-171
GPA (25th-75th percentile): 3.49-3.94
Tuition & Fees: In-state, full-time: $44,600 per year, Out-of-state, full-time: $49,600 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 1,093
Graduates known to be employed nine months after graduation: 98.1%

University of Virginia School of Law

25 Washington and Lee University (Lexington, VA)
Acceptance rate: 24.3%
LSAT scores (25th-75th percentile): 159-165
GPA (25th-75th percentile): 3.5-3.8
Tuition & Fees: Full-time: $41,947 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 395
Graduates known to be employed nine months after graduation: 90.2%

Washington and Lee University School of Law

35 College of William and Mary (Marshall-Wythe) (Williamsburg, VA)
Acceptance rate: 22.0%
LSAT scores (25th-75th percentile): 161-167
GPA (25th-75th percentile): 3.46-3.82
Tuition & Fees: In-state, full-time: $26,200 per year, Out-of-state, full-time: $35,200 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 637
Graduates known to be employed nine months after graduation: 86.9%

College of William and Mary School of Law

40 George Mason University (Arlington, VA)
Acceptance rate: 23.7%
LSAT scores (25th-75th percentile): 157-165
GPA (25th-75th percentile): 3.24-3.78
Tuition & Fees: In-state, full-time: $23,720 per year, Out-of-state, full-time: $38,112 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 510
Graduates known to be employed nine months after graduation: 96.4%

George Mason University School of Law

61 University of Richmond (Williams) (Richmond, VA)
Acceptance rate: 23.7%
LSAT scores (25th-75th percentile): 158-164
GPA (25th-75th percentile): 3.13-3.66
Tuition & Fees: Full-time: $35,430 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 452
Graduates known to be employed nine months after graduation: 88.6%

University of Richmond School of Law

146 Appalachian School of Law (Grundy, VA)
Acceptance rate: 59.6%
LSAT scores (25th-75th percentile): 146-151
GPA (25th-75th percentile): 2.69-3.36
Tuition & Fees: N/A
Enrollment (full-time): N/A
Graduates known to be employed nine months after graduation: 49.1%

Appalachian School of Law

162 Liberty University (Lynchburg, VA)
Acceptance rate: 48.3%
LSAT scores (25th-75th percentile): 148-153
GPA (25th-75th percentile): 2.98-3.53
Tuition & Fees: N/A
Enrollment (full-time): 286
Graduates known to be employed nine months after graduation: 66.7%

Liberty University School of Law

172 Regent University (Virginia Beach, VA)
Acceptance rate: 37.7%
LSAT scores (25th-75th percentile): 150-158
GPA (25th-75th percentile): 2.96-3.6
Tuition & Fees: Full-time: $1,060 per credit
Enrollment (full-time): 414
Graduates known to be employed nine months after graduation: 84.0%

Regent University School of Law

History of the State of Virginia – Mother of Presidents

On October 16, 1859, John Brown and his accomplices seized the arsenal, but the expected riot of local black slaves did not happen. The very next day, local militias surrounded the arsenal, almost completely blocking Brown’s retreat. The raiders moved into the depot building (later known as “John Brown’s Fort”) and fortified themselves there. On October 18, the Marines who arrived at Harpers Ferry attacked the depot, several conspirators were killed during the assault, eight people (including Brown himself) were captured, and only five managed to escape.

John Brown was tried, found guilty of treason and hanged on December 2, 1859. Despite the apparent illegality of Brown’s actions and the failure of his raid on Harpers Ferry, in the eyes of many supporters of the emancipation of slaves, he became a martyr who died for a just cause. In turn, the southerners, faced with the threat of armed attacks from the northern abolitionists, began to arm and prepare for defense.

On February 13, 1861, after the withdrawal of the seven southern states from the United States and the proclamation of the Confederate States of America on February 4, the Convention, organized by the legislators of Virginia, began to work in Richmond, designed to shape the attitude of the state to the issue of secession (secession). At first, the delegates to the Convention, as well as among the population of Virginia in general, did not have a unanimous opinion on this most difficult issue, which split the country into two hostile camps. Only on April 17, 1861, after the shelling of Fort Sumter in South Carolina and the appeal of US President Abraham Lincoln to all the states remaining at that time in the Union to send troops to suppress the uprising, the Virginia Convention decided to secede.

On May 23, in a referendum, the people of Virginia overwhelmingly supported this decision, and the very next day, the city of Alexandria in the north of the state was captured by federal troops. On May 29, 1861, Richmond became the capital of the Confederacy and remained so almost until the end of the Civil War.

The western counties, the majority of whose population were supporters of the United States of America, already in the summer of 1861 practically seceded from Virginia, and in June 1863 officially became a new state called West Virginia.

During the Civil War, many major battles took place in Virginia, from the “First Battle of Bull Run” (“Battle of Manassas”) on July 21, 1861 to the “Battle of Appomattox” on April 9, 1865.