Best Law Schools in Illinois

By | March 2, 2019

Are you pursing a law degree? The TopSchoolsintheUSA.com has generated the latest ranking of best law schools in Illinois that provides Master of Legal Studies (MLS), Master of Dispute Resolution (MDR), Juris Doctor (JD), Master of Laws (LLM), or Doctor of Juridical Science (SJD). You can use the following list to pick a school that fits your needs. These law schools in Illinois are ranked based on the student reviews, alumni surveys, assessment of peer institutions, and official data reported by each law college. In addition, we also provide average LSAT scores, GPA and acceptance rates for each of these law schools in Illinois.

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Best Law Schools in Illinois

National Ranking Best Law Programs
5 University of Chicago (Chicago, IL)
Acceptance rate: 17.5%
LSAT scores (25th-75th percentile): 167-173
GPA (25th-75th percentile): 3.71-3.94
Tuition & Fees: Full-time: $47,502 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 624
Graduates known to be employed nine months after graduation: 97.9%University of Chicago School of Law
12 Northwestern University (Chicago, IL)
Acceptance rate: 19.0%
LSAT scores (25th-75th percentile): 165-171
GPA (25th-75th percentile): 3.35-3.85
Tuition & Fees: Full-time: $51,920 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 801
Graduates known to be employed nine months after graduation: 94.0%Northwestern University School of Law
36 University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (Champaign, IL)
Acceptance rate: 20.2%
LSAT scores (25th-75th percentile): 156-168
GPA (25th-75th percentile): 3.38-3.85
Tuition & Fees: In-state, full-time: $38,567 per year, Out-of-state, full-time: $45,547 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 639
Graduates known to be employed nine months after graduation: 87.2%University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign School of Law
62 Illinois Institute of Technology (Chicago-Kent) (Chicago, IL)
Acceptance rate: 38.7%
LSAT scores (25th-75th percentile): 155-162
GPA (25th-75th percentile): 3.09-3.66
Tuition & Fees: Full-time: $42,030 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 755
Graduates known to be employed nine months after graduation: 90.7%Illinois Institute of Technology School of Law
68 Loyola University Chicago (Chicago, IL)
Acceptance rate: 33.7%
LSAT scores (25th-75th percentile): 156-162
GPA (25th-75th percentile): 3.13-3.57
Tuition & Fees: Full-time: $39,496 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 731
Graduates known to be employed nine months after graduation: 88.7%Loyola University Chicago School of Law
89 DePaul University (Chicago, IL)
Acceptance rate: 42.2%
LSAT scores (25th-75th percentile): 154-160
GPA (25th-75th percentile): 3.13-3.58
Tuition & Fees: Full-time: $41,690 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 828
Graduates known to be employed nine months after graduation: 84.4%DePaul University School of Law
128 John Marshall Law School (Chicago, IL)
Acceptance rate: 49.9%
LSAT scores (25th-75th percentile): 149-156
GPA (25th-75th percentile): 2.98-3.29
Tuition & Fees: Full-time: $38,100 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 1,200
Graduates known to be employed nine months after graduation: 87.8%John Marshall Law School
166 Northern Illinois University (De Kalb, IL)
Acceptance rate: 44.9%
LSAT scores (25th-75th percentile): 150-155
GPA (25th-75th percentile): 3-3.42
Tuition & Fees: In-state, full-time: $18,688 per year, Out-of-state, full-time: $33,311 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 315
Graduates known to be employed nine months after graduation: 75.8%Northern Illinois University School of Law
175 Southern Illinois University, Carbondale (Carbondale, IL)
Acceptance rate: 50.5%
LSAT scores (25th-75th percentile): 151-156
GPA (25th-75th percentile): 2.96-3.62
Tuition & Fees: In-state, full-time: $15,994 per year, Out-of-state, full-time: $36,154 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 373
Graduates known to be employed nine months after graduation: 72.6%Southern Illinois University, Carbondale School of Law

Illinois Recent History

In 1893, the World Exhibition was held in Chicago, in honor of the four hundredth anniversary of the discovery of America, called the “Columbus”. Forty-six countries took part in the exhibition, twenty-seven million (!) people visited it in six months. At the “Columbus” exhibition for the first time electrical devices of alternating current (the inventor of which was Nikola Tesla) were used for lighting, and the world’s first Ferris wheel was built here.

At the beginning of the 20th century, the “Great Migration” of black Americans began from the states of the US South to the Midwest and Northeast, including Illinois. The growing number of African Americans and the growing competition for jobs led to outbreaks of racial hatred, riots, arson, robbery and murder.

So at the end of July 1919, a racially motivated riot began in Chicago, the reason for which was the murder of a black teenager who violated the boundaries of a “white” beach. The police not only refused to detain the white killer, but also arrested African American witnesses. The news of the incident stirred up the “black” quarters of the city, and the reaction of the authorities and the provocations and pogroms of the “white” gangs only increased their fury. Thirty-eight people (including twenty-three African Americans) were killed in the eight days of unrest, for which Illinois National Guard units were brought into the city to stop. The Chicago Riot of 1919 is one of the clearest examples of racial segregation in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and the protest of black American citizens against it.

During Prohibition, Chicago became infamous for its organized crime, the most famous of which was Al Capone.

In 1933-34 Chicago hosted another World’s Fair dedicated to the city’s centenary and called “Age of Progress”. The exhibition was very successful, with over forty million visitors.

In the first half of the 20th century, rather large oil reserves were explored in southern Illinois; by the end of the thirties, the state ranked fourth in the United States in terms of oil production.

Illinois is the “homeland” of the nuclear power industry in the United States (and the whole world). The University of Chicago built the world’s first nuclear reactor (known as “Chicago Woodpile 1”) and in December 1942, the first controlled chain reaction was carried out. This event was of great importance for further research in the field of nuclear physics, as well as for the creation of nuclear weapons by the United States of America.

Research in the field of nuclear physics in Illinois continued actively after the end of World War II. In 1946, the Argonne National Laboratory began operating near Chicago, the first national laboratory in the United States and one of the world’s largest research centers in the fields of energy, fundamental physics, and biology. In 1967, the Fermi National Laboratory (“Fermilab”) was opened in the town of Batavia, located in which the particle accelerator for several decades was the largest in the world.

Nowadays, Illinois confidently occupies a leading position among the US states both in terms of population and the level of economic development .