Best Law Schools in Florida

By | March 2, 2019

Are you pursing a law degree? The TopSchoolsintheUSA.com has generated the latest ranking of best law schools in Florida that provides Master of Legal Studies (MLS), Master of Dispute Resolution (MDR), Juris Doctor (JD), Master of Laws (LLM), or Doctor of Juridical Science (SJD). You can use the following list to pick a school that fits your needs. These law schools in Florida are ranked based on the student reviews, alumni surveys, assessment of peer institutions, and official data reported by each law college. In addition, we also provide average LSAT scores, GPA and acceptance rates for each of these law schools in Florida.

  • A2ZCAMERABLOG: General information about Florida, including state capital, major cities and counties, geography, history, and population statistics of Florida.

Best Law Schools in Florida

National Ranking Best Law Programs
48 University of Florida (Levin) (Gainesville, FL)
Acceptance rate: 28.9%
LSAT scores (25th-75th percentile): 160-164
GPA (25th-75th percentile): 3.43-3.82
Tuition & Fees: In-state, full-time: $18,710 per year, Out-of-state, full-time: $38,075 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 976
Graduates known to be employed nine months after graduation: 85.4%

University of Florida School of Law

52 Florida State University (Tallahassee, FL)
Acceptance rate: 27.0%
LSAT scores (25th-75th percentile): 160-163
GPA (25th-75th percentile): 3.18-3.68
Tuition & Fees: In-state, full-time: $18,343 per year, Out-of-state, full-time: $37,905 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 729
Graduates known to be employed nine months after graduation: 91.4%Florida State University School of Law
72 University of Miami (Coral Gables, FL)
Acceptance rate: 47.0%
LSAT scores (25th-75th percentile): 156-160
GPA (25th-75th percentile): 3.19-3.57
Tuition & Fees: Full-time: $39,848 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 1,290
Graduates known to be employed nine months after graduation: 83.5%

University of Miami School of Law

115 Florida International University (Miami, FL)
Acceptance rate: 20.5%
LSAT scores (25th-75th percentile): 152-157
GPA (25th-75th percentile): 3.22-3.77
Tuition & Fees: In-state, full-time: $16,585 per year, Out-of-state, full-time: $30,370 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 369
Graduates known to be employed nine months after graduation: 90.1%

Florida International University School of Law

121 Stetson University (Gulfport, FL)
Acceptance rate: 37.9%
LSAT scores (25th-75th percentile): 153-157
GPA (25th-75th percentile): 3.11-3.57
Tuition & Fees: Full-time: $35,466 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 855
Graduates known to be employed nine months after graduation: 78.3%

Stetson University School of Law

148 Ave Maria School of Law (Naples, FL)
Acceptance rate: 53.8%
LSAT scores (25th-75th percentile): 146-153
GPA (25th-75th percentile): 2.79-3.48
Tuition & Fees: Full-time: $36,448 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 489
Graduates known to be employed nine months after graduation: 65.5%

Ave Maria School of Law

149 Barry University (Orlando, FL)
Acceptance rate: 58.0%
LSAT scores (25th-75th percentile): 147-152
GPA (25th-75th percentile): 2.55-3.26
Tuition & Fees: Full-time: $33,630 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 528
Graduates known to be employed nine months after graduation: 60.4%

Barry University School of Law

158 Florida A&M University (Orlando, FL)
Acceptance rate: 40.8%
LSAT scores (25th-75th percentile): 145-151
GPA (25th-75th percentile): 2.81-3.34
Tuition & Fees: In-state, full-time: $12,424 per year, Out-of-state, full-time: $32,327 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 509
Graduates known to be employed nine months after graduation: 55.6%

Florida A&M University School of Law

159 Florida Coastal School of Law (Jacksonville, FL)
Acceptance rate: 66.0%
LSAT scores (25th-75th percentile): 145-151
GPA (25th-75th percentile): 2.83-3.34
Tuition & Fees: Full-time: $36,968 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 1,702
Graduates known to be employed nine months after graduation: 79.7%

Florida Coastal School of Law

168 Nova Southeastern University (Broad) (Fort Lauderdale, FL)
Acceptance rate: 40.5%
LSAT scores (25th-75th percentile): 148-152
GPA (25th-75th percentile): 2.98-3.43
Tuition & Fees: Full-time: $33,250 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 855
Graduates known to be employed nine months after graduation: 79.2%

Nova Southeastern University School of Law

178 St. Thomas University (Miami Gardens, FL)
Acceptance rate: 46.0%
LSAT scores (25th-75th percentile): 148-153
GPA (25th-75th percentile): 2.66-3.32
Tuition & Fees: Full-time: $34,618 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 719
Graduates known to be employed nine months after graduation: 71.8%

St. Thomas University School of Law

Early History of the State of Florida

On the territory of the modern state of Florida, people have lived for more than fourteen thousand years. By the time Europeans arrived on the lands of Florida, numerous (according to some estimates, up to 350,000 people) tribes of American Indians lived here, including those belonging to the Apalachian peoples (in the northwest), Timucua (northern and central regions of the state), ice (in coast of the Atlantic Ocean in the Indian River and Cape Canaveral), calusa (southwest Florida), tequesta (southeast coast), mayimi (around Lake Okeechobee), tokobaga (Tampa Bay area) and many others.

The Indians living in north and northwest Florida were close to the Mississippi culture, they were farmers with corn as the main crop. The rich nature of Florida allowed the Indians of the southern part of the state to live by hunting and gathering.

The number of Indian peoples of Florida was greatly reduced due to infectious diseases introduced by Europeans, to which the locals had no immunity. In addition, many Indians in northern Florida were killed or enslaved during raids by British colonists from the Carolinas.

In the 18th century, under the pressure of European colonists, Creek Indians came to the lands of Florida from the north, from the territory of Alabama and Georgia . Displacing the indigenous tribes and partially merging with them, they formed a new people – the Seminoles, who later played a very important role in the history of Florida.

Florida was the first region in the continental United States to be discovered by Europeans. In April 1513, the Spanish conquistador Juan Ponce de Leon, who was looking for new lands north of Cuba on behalf of the King of Spain, landed on the east coast of Florida. It was he who, in honor of the Easter holiday (in Spanish Pascua Florida, “floral Easter”), called the lands he discovered La Florida (“blooming land”).