Best Engineering Schools in Virginia

By | April 29, 2018

This article features top engineering colleges in Virginia that offer master and doctoral degrees in the fields of biological engineering, chemical engineering, computer science, materials engineering, mechanical engineering, etc. Please be informed that each school receives national wide rank as the ranking compares all engineering schools in the United States. Some important ranking factors include average GRE scores, alumni surveys, current student interviews, institutional research publications, and peer college assessment. In the following list of best engineering schools in the state of Virginia, you can see tuition cost for both in-state and out-of-state students, acceptable rates and admissions statistics for each top ranked engineering college.

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Best Engineering Schools in Virginia

National Ranking Virginia Top Engineering Programs
24 Virginia Tech (Blacksburg, VA)
Overall acceptance rate: 20.3%
Average GRE quantitative score (master’s and Ph.D. students): 755
Tuition: In-state, full-time: $10,048 per year, Out-of-state, full-time: $19,497 per year
Total graduate engineering enrollment: 2,336
Research expenditures per faculty member: $471,162
Engineering school research expenditures (2010-2011 fiscal year): $152,656,772
Faculty membership in National Academy of Engineering: 3.9%
40 University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA)
Overall acceptance rate: 16.9%
Average GRE quantitative score (master’s and Ph.D. students): 761
Tuition: In-state, full-time: $12,762 per year, Out-of-state, full-time: $22,086 per year
Total graduate engineering enrollment: 685
Research expenditures per faculty member: $478,011
Engineering school research expenditures (2010-2011 fiscal year): $62,141,496
Faculty membership in National Academy of Engineering: 4.6%
115 George Mason University (Volgenau) (Fairfax, VA)
Overall acceptance rate: 60.1%
Average GRE quantitative score (master’s and Ph.D. students): 716
Tuition: In-state, full-time: $13,464 per year, Out-of-state, full-time: $26,406 per year
Total graduate engineering enrollment: 1,595
Research expenditures per faculty member: $194,763
Engineering school research expenditures (2010-2011 fiscal year): $18,502,564
Faculty membership in National Academy of Engineering: 1.0%
150 Virginia Commonwealth University (Richmond, VA)
Overall acceptance rate: 66.2%
Average GRE quantitative score (master’s and Ph.D. students): 711
Tuition: In-state, full-time: $7,535 per year, Out-of-state, full-time: $16,063 per year
Total graduate engineering enrollment: 246
Research expenditures per faculty member: $90,543
Engineering school research expenditures (2010-2011 fiscal year): $4,617,704
Faculty membership in National Academy of Engineering: 0.0%
163 Old Dominion University (Batten) (Norfolk, VA)
Overall acceptance rate: 77.1%
Average GRE quantitative score (master’s and Ph.D. students): 700
Tuition: In-state, full-time: $379 per credit, Out-of-state, full-time: $961 per credit
Total graduate engineering enrollment: 799
Research expenditures per faculty member: $89,233
Engineering school research expenditures (2010-2011 fiscal year): $9,369,496
Faculty membership in National Academy of Engineering: 0.0%

National battlefields in Virginia

The Battlefield of Petersberg, dedicated to several battles in the area of ​​this city in 1864–1865 during the Civil War Also located here is the Poplar Grove National Cemetery.

National Memorials in Virginia

The Patrick Henry Memorial (also known as Red Hill) is the home-museum and burial place of an outstanding statesman, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. Located near the city of Brookneel.

The Robert E. Lee Memorial (also known as the Arlington House) is the home-museum of the famous military leader who commanded the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. Located in the city of Arlington, built in 1803-18.

National coastline in Virginia

The Assateague Island National Seashore is a barrier island about sixty kilometers long off the Atlantic coast of the states of Virginia and Maryland. Known, among other things, for the wild horses that live on it.

National park roads in Virginia

The Blue Ridge National Park Road is a 755-kilometer-long highway in Virginia and North Carolina, mostly along the Blue Ridge Range.

“Colonial Boulevard” is a road connecting the peaks of the “historic triangle of Virginia” (Jamestown, Yorktown and Williamsburg). It is part of the Colonial National Historical Park.

George Washington Memorial Road, running along the banks of the Potomac River (including a small section in Maryland and Washington, D.C.).

National trails in Virginia

The Appalachian Trail is a hiking route that stretches along the Appalachian mountain range from Maine in the north to Georgia in the south and is very popular in the United States. About 885 km of trail (about a quarter of the trail’s total length) passes through Virginia, mostly along the Blue Ridge near Skyline Drive in Shenandoah National Falls and Blue Ridge Parkway.

The Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail follows the Chesapeake Bay through the states of Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, and Washington, D.C.. The route is dedicated to the exploration of the region, which was carried out in 1608 by the famous leader of the colony in Jamestown, Captain John Smith.

The Revolutionary Road of Washington and Rochambeau is a 1,090 km route from Rhode Island to Virginia, which was passed in 1781 during the Revolutionary War by the Continental Army under the leadership of George Washington and the French Expeditionary Force under the command of Jean-Baptiste de Rochambeau.

The Mountain National Historic Victory Trail passes through the states of Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina, and South Carolina. Its route is connected with the history of the American Revolutionary War, when patriotic militias from several states crossed the mountains along the paths and on October 7, 1780 participated in the Battle of Kings Mountain in South Carolina.

The Potomac Historic Trail is a route in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, and Washington, D.C. along which numerous historical landmarks are located.

The Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail in Maryland, Virginia, and Washington, D.C. commemorates the events of the Chesapeake Campaign of the Anglo-American War of 1812–1815.