Best Engineering Schools in New Jersey

By | April 29, 2018

This article features top engineering colleges in New Jersey that offer master and doctoral degrees in the fields of biological engineering, chemical engineering, computer science, materials engineering, mechanical engineering, etc. Please be informed that each school receives national wide rank as the ranking compares all engineering schools in the United States. Some important ranking factors include average GRE scores, alumni surveys, current student interviews, institutional research publications, and peer college assessment. In the following list of best engineering schools in the state of New Jersey, you can see tuition cost for both in-state and out-of-state students, acceptable rates and admissions statistics for each top ranked engineering college.

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Best Engineering Schools in New Jersey

National Ranking New Jersey Top Engineering Programs
21 Princeton University (Princeton, NJ)
Overall acceptance rate: 10.6%
Average GRE quantitative score (master’s and Ph.D. students): N/A
Tuition: Full-time: $38,620 per year
Total graduate engineering enrollment: 564
Research expenditures per faculty member: $578,687
Engineering school research expenditures (2010-2011 fiscal year): $71,757,250
Faculty membership in National Academy of Engineering: 15.9%
50 Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey–New Brunswick (Piscataway, NJ)
Overall acceptance rate: 19.7%
Average GRE quantitative score (master’s and Ph.D. students): 756
Tuition: In-state, full-time: $14,664 per year, Out-of-state, full-time: $23,664 per year
Total graduate engineering enrollment: 931
Research expenditures per faculty member: $334,337
Engineering school research expenditures (2010-2011 fiscal year): $55,500,101
Faculty membership in National Academy of Engineering: 5.1%
74 Stevens Institute of Technology (Schaefer) (Hoboken, NJ)
Overall acceptance rate: 73.8%
Average GRE quantitative score (master’s and Ph.D. students): 742
Tuition: Full-time: $1,220 per credit
Total graduate engineering enrollment: 1,720
Research expenditures per faculty member: $367,151
Engineering school research expenditures (2010-2011 fiscal year): $25,700,586
Faculty membership in National Academy of Engineering: 1.3%
96 New Jersey Institute of Technology (Newark, NJ)
Overall acceptance rate: 68.4%
Average GRE quantitative score (master’s and Ph.D. students): 708
Tuition: In-state, full-time: $15,960 per year, Out-of-state, full-time: $22,672 per year
Total graduate engineering enrollment: 2,034
Research expenditures per faculty member: $302,568
Engineering school research expenditures (2010-2011 fiscal year): $45,385,335
Faculty membership in National Academy of Engineering: 0.8%

Recent History of the State of New Jersey

In the twenties and thirties of the XX century, airships were very popular in the world, in particular models with a rigid frame – “zeppelins”. In the United States, the Lakehurst Naval Aeronautical Base, where airships were built and based, was located in New Jersey, not far from the state capital, Trenton.

The first airship built at Lakehurst, the Shenandoah, took to the skies in 1923 and operated until 1925, when it crashed in Ohio. Following him, the US Navy built several more airships of various types.

But it was in Lakehurst that the era of airships ended. It happened on May 6, 1937, when the world’s largest German zeppelin, the Hindenburg, arrived from Frankfurt with thirty-six passengers and sixty-one crew members on board, suddenly caught fire and collapsed in front of a large audience, journalists and newsreels. Thirty-six people died as a result of the disaster, and photographs and film footage of the Hindenburg crash undermined confidence in airships for a long time.

In 1938, a tragicomic story took place in New Jersey, which received wide publicity. On October 30, the CBS radio station aired a message that a huge flaming object fell twenty miles from Trenton, from which aggressive monsters came out, killing people and destroying houses. The announcer continued to report, talking about the terrible aliens attacking New Jersey. Panic began in the state, many people barricaded themselves in their homes, others abandoned their homes in fear and left.

The terrible report turned out to be just a talented staging of HG Wells’ War of the Worlds. The text was read by the writer’s namesake, the young actor Orson Welles, the future Hollywood star and the lead actor in the film “Citizen Kane”, recognized as the best work of US cinema.

During the Second World War, New Jersey again reoriented itself to the production of military products, including numerous warships. Training camps and airfields were located throughout the state, as well as an internment camp for Japanese Americans.

In the fifties, the world’s first port container terminal was built in the Newark and Elizabeth area. During the Cold War, fourteen air defense missile batteries were stationed in New Jersey to protect New York and Philadelphia. In 1967, Glasboro hosted talks between US President Lyndon Johnson and Chairman of the USSR Council of Ministers Alexei Kosygin, one of the first international meetings of the détente era.

In the 1960s New Jersey experienced a series of racial riots due to declining industrial jobs, deteriorating urban living conditions, police prejudice, and other causes. In 1964, forty-six people were injured in the Jersey City riots, eight were injured in Paterson and six were injured in Elizabeth. Significant material damage was also caused. In 1967 Newark, six days of rioting, violence, looting, and destruction sparked by the arrest and beating of black taxi driver John Smith resulted in twenty-six people being killed, hundreds injured, and more than 1,500 arrested (see also Detroit riot of 1967).

In 1976, New Jersey decided to legalize gambling. In 1978, the first casino opened in Atlantic City, then, one after another, several more, and for a decade, before the start of the “mega-hotel era”, Atlantic City successfully challenged Las Vegas for the title of “entertainment capital of the United States”.