Best Engineering Schools in Missouri

By | April 29, 2018

This article features top engineering colleges in Missouri that offer master and doctoral degrees in the fields of biological engineering, chemical engineering, computer science, materials engineering, mechanical engineering, etc. Please be informed that each school receives national wide rank as the ranking compares all engineering schools in the United States. Some important ranking factors include average GRE scores, alumni surveys, current student interviews, institutional research publications, and peer college assessment. In the following list of best engineering schools in the state of Missouri, you can see tuition cost for both in-state and out-of-state students, acceptable rates and admissions statistics for each top ranked engineering college.

  • Check Bridgat to see all colleges and universities in Missouri.

Best Engineering Schools in Missouri

National Ranking Missouri Top Engineering Programs
53 Washington University in St. Louis (St. Louis, MO)
Overall acceptance rate: 36.0%
Average GRE quantitative score (master’s and Ph.D. students): 772
Tuition: Full-time: $40,950 per year
Total graduate engineering enrollment: 701
Research expenditures per faculty member: $301,467
Engineering school research expenditures (2010-2011 fiscal year): $23,213,000
Faculty membership in National Academy of Engineering: 2.6%
81 University of Missouri (Columbia, MO)
Overall acceptance rate: 35.6%
Average GRE quantitative score (master’s and Ph.D. students): 732
Tuition: In-state, full-time: $6,300 per year, Out-of-state, full-time: $14,570 per year
Total graduate engineering enrollment: 585
Research expenditures per faculty member: $295,778
Engineering school research expenditures (2010-2011 fiscal year): $33,423,000
Faculty membership in National Academy of Engineering: 0.0%
83 Missouri University of Science & Technology (Rolla, MO)
Overall acceptance rate: 54.6%
Average GRE quantitative score (master’s and Ph.D. students): 727
Tuition: In-state, full-time: $5,881 per year, Out-of-state, full-time: $15,183 per year
Total graduate engineering enrollment: 1,103
Research expenditures per faculty member: $200,778
Engineering school research expenditures (2010-2011 fiscal year): $33,529,977
Faculty membership in National Academy of Engineering: 0.6%
170 St. Louis University (Parks) (St. Louis, MO)
Overall acceptance rate: 32.4%
Average GRE quantitative score (master’s and Ph.D. students): N/A
Tuition: Full-time: $970 per credit
Total graduate engineering enrollment: 44
Research expenditures per faculty member: $86,719
Engineering school research expenditures (2010-2011 fiscal year): $520,316
Faculty membership in National Academy of Engineering: 0.0%
185 University of Missouri–Kansas City (Kansas City, MO)
Overall acceptance rate: 45.6%
Average GRE quantitative score (master’s and Ph.D. students): 749
Tuition: In-state, full-time: $322 per credit, Out-of-state, full-time: $831 per credit
Total graduate engineering enrollment: 335
Research expenditures per faculty member: $59,000
Engineering school research expenditures (2010-2011 fiscal year): $1,770,000
Faculty membership in National Academy of Engineering: 0.0%

History of St. Louis, Missouri

In the summer of that year, a cholera epidemic broke out in St. Louis, which killed about five thousand people. The consequence of this tragedy was the creation of a sewerage system in the city, the removal of cemeteries outside the city limits, and the implementation of a complex of reclamation and hydraulic engineering works.

With the outbreak of the Civil War, in contrast to the population of rural Missouri, among whom there were many supporters of the Confederacy, most (but not all) residents of St. Louis supported the Union (especially the numerous settlers from Germany who hated slavery. St. Louis was the most important strategic point, both due to its geographical location, and because of the large arsenal located in the suburbs.During the years of the war, there were no major battles between the armies of northerners and southerners in the city area, but, nevertheless, armed clashes between the warring parties were.

In early May 1861, at Camp Jackson near St. Louis, Confederate militiamen were building up their forces, planning to seize a significant amount of weapons stored in the arsenal. On May 10, 1861, about six thousand volunteers, led by US Army Captain Nathaniel Lyon, surrounded the camp and, without firing a shot, forced the conspirators to surrender. However, during the convoy of more than six hundred and fifty arrested people through the streets of the city, a conflict arose between the residents of St. Louis who were watching what was happening. It is not known who fired the first shot, but twenty-eight people were killed and over fifty more were injured in the riot. Shooting continued the next day, when six more people were killed. The incident went down in history as “The Capture of Camp Jackson”.

After the end of the war, St. Louis continued its explosive growth. The city’s economy was developing rapidly, its population was growing, and new infrastructure facilities were being created. Among the most important are the significant improvement of the city’s water supply (in 1866, a cholera epidemic broke out in the city again), the creation of several parks and, of course, the construction of a bridge across the Mississippi.

As early as 1851, the construction of the “Pacific” railroad began in St. Louis, which in 1855 reached the state capital, Jefferson City. The development of the railway network was interrupted by the war, but already in 1865 the steel line came to Kansas City. At the same time, the growth of traffic was very strongly restrained by the absence of a bridge across the Mississippi in St. Louis, but plans for its construction met with strong resistance from the owners of steamboats plying the great river, who feared that the insufficiently high bridge would interfere with navigation.