Best Engineering Schools in Mississippi

By | April 29, 2018

This article features top engineering colleges in Mississippi that offer master and doctoral degrees in the fields of biological engineering, chemical engineering, computer science, materials engineering, mechanical engineering, etc. Please be informed that each school receives national wide rank as the ranking compares all engineering schools in the United States. Some important ranking factors include average GRE scores, alumni surveys, current student interviews, institutional research publications, and peer college assessment. In the following list of best engineering schools in the state of Mississippi, you can see tuition cost for both in-state and out-of-state students, acceptable rates and admissions statistics for each top ranked engineering college.

  • Check Bridgat to see all colleges and universities in Mississippi.

Best Engineering Schools in Mississippi

National Ranking Top Engineering Programs
82 Mississippi State University (Bagley) (Mississippi State, MS)
Overall acceptance rate: 24.6%
Average GRE quantitative score (master’s and Ph.D. students): 730
Tuition: In-state, full-time: $7,740 per year, Out-of-state, full-time: $19,560 per year
Total graduate engineering enrollment: 608
Research expenditures per faculty member: $498,771
Engineering school research expenditures (2010-2011 fiscal year): $52,371,000
Faculty membership in National Academy of Engineering: 0.0%
184 University of Mississippi (University, MS)
Overall acceptance rate: 34.9%
Average GRE quantitative score (master’s and Ph.D. students): 668
Tuition: In-state, full-time: $5,790 per year, Out-of-state, full-time: $14,796 per year
Total graduate engineering enrollment: 169
Research expenditures per faculty member: $205,671
Engineering school research expenditures (2010-2011 fiscal year): $9,872,215
Faculty membership in National Academy of Engineering: 0.0%

Recent History of Mississippi

On January 9, 1861, Mississippi became the second (after South Carolina) state to secede from the United States. The independent Republic of Mississippi was proclaimed, but already in February, after the formation of the Confederate States of America, the state became part of the new state. Jefferson Davis, who had previously been a US Senator from Mississippi, became President of the Confederation. The overwhelming majority of whites in the state supported secession, about eighty thousand of them fought in the army of the southerners (and only about five hundred in the army of the Union). At the same time, about seventeen thousand freed or runaway slaves from Mississippi fought on the side of the northerners.

Several battles took place in Mississippi during the Civil War, the most important of which was the Siege of Vicksburg in May-July 1863. After the capture of this strategically important city by the troops of Northern General Ulysses Grant (the future eighteenth President of the United States), the United States gained control of the Mississippi River. The Victory at Vicksburg is considered (along with the Battle of Gettysburg) one of the turning points of the American Civil War.

In 1870, after the adoption of laws prohibiting slavery, the state of Mississippi was again admitted to the United States, but for many decades its black residents were infringed on their rights. Thanks to a series of legislative restrictions on participation in elections, wealthy landowners retained power in the state, and for former slaves, slavery was replaced by economic dependence. Together with the constant terror from white racists, the inability to get an education and the lack of work, all this served as the reason for the mass migration of blacks from Mississippi (and other states of the US South) at the beginning of the 20th century to the Northeast and Midwest, in particular to New York, Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland and other large industrial cities.

The Magnolia State suffered from floods, most notably the Great Mississippi Flood in 1927. Since this devastating disaster, a number of dams, canals, reservoirs and other waterworks have been built or upgraded across the state to contain the elements.