Best Business Schools in North Carolina

By | March 2, 2019

Search top business school MBA programs in the state of North Carolina. Find latest rankings of MBA schools national wide and state wide. For detailed admissions statistics and graduate employment rate, check the following table for each top-ranked business college within North Carolina, with acceptance rate, average GPA and GMAT scores, as well as well tuition and starting salary information of all best MBA universities in North Carolina.

  • The capital city of North Carolina is Raleigh, which was established in 1792. With a land area of 114.6 mi2, Raleigh has a total population of 474,069 according to allcitypopulation.

National Ranking Best Business MBA Programs
12 Duke University (Fuqua) (Durham, NC)
Acceptance rate: 26.5%
Average GMAT score: 689
Average undergraduate GPA: 3.44
Tuition: Full-time: $50,300 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 888
Average starting salary and bonus: $128,666
Full-time graduates employed at graduation: 78.4%

Duke University Business School

20 University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill (Kenan-Flagler) (Chapel Hill, NC)
Acceptance rate: 37.7%
Average GMAT score: 689
Average undergraduate GPA: 3.31
Tuition: In-state, full-time: $23,339 per year; Out-of-state, full-time: $47,221 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 575
Average starting salary and bonus: $101,904
Full-time graduates employed at graduation: 74.1%

University of North Carolina--Chapel Hill Business School

47 Wake Forest University (Babcock) (Winston-Salem, NC)
Acceptance rate: 41.2%
Average GMAT score: 651
Average undergraduate GPA: 3.20
Tuition: Full-time: $38,988 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 135
Average starting salary and bonus: $91,504
Full-time graduates employed at graduation: 71.4%

Wake Forest University Business School

78 North Carolina State University (Jenkins) (Raleigh, NC)
Acceptance rate: 55.8%
Average GMAT score: 592
Average undergraduate GPA: 3.40
Tuition: In-state, full-time: $14,883 per year; Out-of-state, full-time: $27,416 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 96
Average starting salary and bonus: $75,309
Full-time graduates employed at graduation: 61.5%

North Carolina State University Business School

128 University of North Carolina–Greensboro (Bryan) (Greensboro, NC)
Acceptance rate: 90.9%
Average GMAT score: 526
Average undergraduate GPA: 3.23
Tuition: In-state, full-time: $8,670 per year; Out-of-state, full-time: $20,896 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 60
Average starting salary and bonus: $48,692
Full-time graduates employed at graduation: 85.7%

University of North Carolina--Greensboro Business School

129 University of North Carolina–Wilmington (Cameron) (Wilmington, NC)
Acceptance rate: 73.3%
Average GMAT score: 540
Average undergraduate GPA: 3.25
Tuition: In-state, full-time: $17,300 per year; Out-of-state, full-time: $17,300 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 30
Average starting salary and bonus: $53,750
Full-time graduates employed at graduation: 0.0%

University of North Carolina--Wilmington Business School

History of the State of North Carolina

Several battles took place in North Carolina during the Civil War, the most famous of which are the attacks on Fort Fisher and the Battle of Bentonville. Wilmington, which was called the “Gibraltar of the South”, by the end of the war remained the last port available to the Confederacy on the Atlantic coast. It was through him that the southerners could sell tobacco and cotton to the British colonies and buy much-needed ammunition and equipment for them. To protect Wilmington, Fort Fisher was built back in 1861, equipped with batteries of coastal artillery. In December 1864, the northerners made the first attempt to capture the fort, which ended in failure. On January 12, 1865, fifty-six ships of the Union fleet approached the fort, after a two and a half day bombardment, about eight thousand soldiers were landed, six hours later captured the fortifications of the southerners. The Second Battle of Fort Fisher is considered the largest amphibious operation conducted prior to World War II.

The Battle of Bentonville lasted three days, from March 19 to March 21, 1865. It was one of the last battles of the war, during which the troops of the northerners under the command of General Sherman defeated the Confederates. The site of the Battle of Bentonville was designated a National Historic Landmark in the United States in 1996.

In 1868, following the ratification of a new state constitution outlawing slavery, North Carolina was re-admitted to the United States of America. As with other southern states, the reconstruction period for the “Tar Heels State” was very difficult. Before the war, the economy of North Carolina was largely based on plantations that used slave labor, now it was necessary to create new forms of agriculture. In the last decades of the 19th century, industry developed rapidly in the Piedmont area, primarily textile manufacturing, furniture making, and tobacco processing.

Despite the abolition of slavery, the situation of black citizens of North Carolina remained very difficult. Racist sentiment prevailed among most state legislators and many ordinary citizens. At the same time, in the seventies and eighties of the “couple century”, many elective posts (especially in local government bodies) were occupied by African Americans; in 1992). At the same time, laws were passed in the state that complicate participation in elections for African Americans (as, indeed, for the poor with white skin).

The practice of intimidation and violence against former slaves was widespread. In North Carolina, the Red Shirts, who were called the “military wing of the Democratic Party,” felt at ease. Unlike the Ku Klux Klan, the Red Shirts acted openly, often exerting significant influence on election results. In 1898, in Wilmington, white racists seized and burned the office of a pro-black city newspaper, forcing the mayor and city council to resign. Throughout the city, the “Red Shirts” attacked African Americans, several dozen people died, hundreds of people fled. The Wilmington uprising is the only violent overthrow of a municipal government in US history.

In 1900, the brothers Wilbur and Orville Wright selected the coast near Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, for their flying machine experiments. It was here that on December 17, 1903, the Wright brothers for the first time in the world managed to fly on an apparatus heavier than air with an engine.