Best Business Schools in Missouri

By | March 2, 2019

Search top business school MBA programs in the state of Missouri. Find latest rankings of MBA schools national wide and state wide. For detailed admissions statistics and graduate employment rate, check the following table for each top-ranked business college within Missouri, with acceptance rate, average GPA and GMAT scores, as well as well tuition and starting salary information of all best MBA universities in Missouri.

Missouri is home to a number of excellent business schools offering a variety of undergraduate and graduate degree programs as well as certificates tailored towards gaining specialized knowledge or skills in certain fields. From large state universities to smaller private institutions, Missouri has many options for potential students looking to pursue their business studies.

The University of Missouri (MU), located in Columbia, is the state’s largest public university and offers a wide range of undergraduate and graduate degree programs in business-related fields such as accounting, finance, marketing, management and economics. MU also offers specialized master’s degrees such as an MS in Agribusiness or an MS in Information Systems Management along with numerous certificates across various disciplines. In addition to its academic offerings, MU also has several research centers focusing on topics such as sustainability or global supply chain management that provide students with valuable hands-on research opportunities outside the classroom setting.

Washington University in St. Louis is another prestigious business school located in Missouri that offers undergraduates majors like accounting and finance; master’s programs like MBA or MS in Business Administration; plus certificates across various fields including project management and financial analysis & planning among others. Washington University also provides students with access to several research centers focusing on topics such as sustainability or global supply chain management that give them practical experience outside of their classroom studies.

Missouri State University (MSU) is another great option for those looking to pursue their business studies located near Springfield which offers undergraduate majors such as economics, international business and marketing; master’s degrees like MBA or MS in Information Systems Management; plus numerous certificates across various disciplines. Additionally, MSU has research centers focusing on topics like sustainability or global supply chain management that provide students with valuable hands-on experience outside the classroom setting.

Finally, Webster University is a private institution based out of St Louis which offers undergraduates majors like accounting and finance; masters programs like MBA or MS in Business Administration; plus certificates across various fields including project management and financial analysis & planning among others. Webster also provides students with access to several research centers focusing on topics such as sustainability or global supply chain management that give them practical experience outside the classroom setting.

In conclusion, Missouri has many excellent business schools offering an array of undergraduate and graduate degree programs along with numerous certificate programs tailored towards gaining specialized knowledge or skills within certain fields like accounting or cybersecurity. Each school has its own unique advantages so it is important that potential students do their research before deciding on where they want to pursue their business degree.

  • The capital city of Missouri is Jefferson City, which was established in 1826. With a land area of 27.3 mi2, Jefferson City has a total population of 42,838 according to timedictionary.

Best Business Schools in Missouri

National Ranking Best Business MBA Programs
22 Washington University in St. Louis (Olin) (St. Louis, MO)
Acceptance rate: 28.1%
Average GMAT score: 696
Average undergraduate GPA: 3.32
Tuition: Full-time: $46,000 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 287
Average starting salary and bonus: $99,354
Full-time graduates employed at graduation: 68.8%Washington University in St. Louis Business School
54 University of Missouri (Trulaske) (Columbia, MO)
Acceptance rate: 45.4%
Average GMAT score: 647
Average undergraduate GPA: 3.49
Tuition: In-state, full-time: $9,148 per year; Out-of-state, full-time: $23,618 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 193
Average starting salary and bonus: $56,254
Full-time graduates employed at graduation: 85.3%University of Missouri Business School
82 St. Louis University (Cook) (St. Louis, MO)
Acceptance rate: 82.0%
Average GMAT score: 582
Average undergraduate GPA: 3.36
Tuition: Full-time: $51,015 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 44
Average starting salary and bonus: $58,136
Full-time graduates employed at graduation: 45.2%St. Louis University Business School
119 Truman State University (Kirksville, MO)
Acceptance rate: N/A
Average GMAT score: N/A
Average undergraduate GPA: N/A
Tuition: N/A
Enrollment (full-time): 46
Average starting salary and bonus: N/A
Full-time graduates employed at graduation: 54.5%Truman State University Business School

According to transporthint, Missouri is a state located in the Midwestern United States. It is bordered by Iowa to the north, Illinois to the east, Tennessee and Arkansas to the south and Kansas and Nebraska to the west. It is the 18th most populous state in the United States with a population of approximately 6 million people as of 2020. The capital of Missouri is Jefferson City and its largest city is Kansas City. Missouri was originally part of French Louisiana before becoming part of the United States after being acquired in 1803 as part of the Louisiana Purchase. It became an official state on August 10, 1821 after being admitted into Union during the American Civil War. Missouri has a humid continental climate with hot summers and cold winters making it ideal for agriculture production. Agriculture has been an important part of Missouri’s economy for many years with corn, soybeans and wheat being some of its primary crops. Other important economic sectors include manufacturing, education, healthcare, transportation and tourism.

Missouri is home to many interesting natural features such as Mark Twain National Forest, Ozark National Scenic Riverways and Table Rock Lake State Park. It also has a rich cultural history with many festivals celebrating art, music, food and history throughout Missouri including festivals like Festival of Nations in St Louis. Some of its most popular tourist attractions include Branson which is known for its live entertainment shows; Silver Dollar City which features amusement park rides; St Louis which features Gateway Arch; Hannibal which was home to author Mark Twain; Meramec Caverns which are some of America’s oldest caves; and Lake Ozark which offers water sports activities all year round. With so much to offer visitors from all over the world, Missouri is a great place to explore for anyone looking for an exciting vacation destination.

History of St. Louis

Already about a thousand years ago, in the area of modern St. Louis, there were settlements of Mississippian Indians, evidence of which are numerous mounds (hence the nickname “Mound City”). The first Europeans to explore the area of ​​the future city were the French Jacques Marquette and Louis Jollier, who traveled in 1673 along the Mississippi River. Nine years later, another Frenchman, the famous Rene de La Salle, proclaimed French ownership of the lands he had explored, called “Louisiana”.

In 1764, near the confluence of the Missouri and Mississippi rivers, a settlement was founded by Pierre Leclade and Auguste Chouteau, named “Saint Louis” in honor of the French king Louis IX “Saint”. The main occupation of the settlers was buying furs from the Indians, but a year after the founding of the trading post, the French authorities began to distribute land plots around St.

Back in 1762, according to diplomatic agreements, Spain received control of Louisiana, but practically representatives of Madrid appeared in St. Louis only in 1770. At the same time, the first Catholic church was built in the city, later religion played a significant role in the development of St. Louis (it was not by chance that it was called the “Rome of the West”).

On May 26, 1780, during the American War of Independence (in which Spain sided with the young American state), St. Louis was attacked by Indian troops led by British officers. The attack was repulsed by city militia forces, and the incident went down in history as the “Battle of St. Louis”.

In 1800, Louisiana again became part of France, and in 1803, after the purchase of French possessions in North America by the United States, the lands west of the Mississippi (including St. Louis) became American. The ” Stars and Stripes ” was raised over the city on March 10, 1804.

Almost immediately, St. Louis became known as the “Gateway to the West.” From here, already in May of the same year, 1804, the Lewis and Clark expedition, which later became famous, set off for the Pacific coast. Two years later, in 1806, Zebulon Pike went to the Rocky Mountains with his detachment. In the following years and decades, many explorers and settlers followed in their footsteps, playing a crucial role in the development of the US West.

In 1805, St. Louis became the capital of the newly created Louisiana Territory, and in 1812, the capital of the Missouri Territory. In 1809, a city council was elected for the first time in St. Louis. In 1820, the US Congress passed a resolution (known as the “Missouri Compromise”), according to which new states could be admitted to the Union only in pairs: one “slave” and one “free”. On August 10, 1821, Missouri became the twenty-fourth state of the United States (at the same time as Maine).

On December 9, 1822, the first city charter of St. Louis was approved by the legislators of the new state, and in April 1823 the city’s first mayor, William Lane, was elected. The city developed rapidly, largely due to the development of steamship communications and its convenient location. By 1830, St. Louis had over five thousand residents, a courthouse, a college (later to become a university), a hospital, a theater, several Protestant churches, and a Catholic diocese. Banks, insurance companies, various wholesale warehouses and shops appeared. Not far from the city were also located an arsenal and a military camp, known as “Jefferson Barracks”.

The year 1849 turned out to be very terrible for the city. On May 17, a fire that broke out on a steamer moored at the pier spread to twenty-three neighboring ships, destroyed the mountains of goods on the wharf (including a significant amount of black powder, the explosions of which further intensified the raging elements) and engulfed more than four hundred buildings. The result of the “Great Fire of St. Louis” was the decision by the city authorities to build new buildings only from stone or brick.