Best Business Schools in Minnesota

By | March 2, 2019

Search top business school MBA programs in the state of Minnesota. Find latest rankings of MBA schools national wide and state wide. For detailed admissions statistics and graduate employment rate, check the following table for each top-ranked business college within Minnesota, with acceptance rate, average GPA and GMAT scores, as well as well tuition and starting salary information of all best MBA universities in Minnesota.

The state of Minnesota is home to a number of excellent business schools that offer a wide variety of degree programs and certificates for students seeking to further their education and career prospects. The University of Minnesota’s Carlson School of Management, located in Minneapolis, is one of the most prestigious business schools in the United States and offers a range of undergraduate and graduate programs in accounting, finance, marketing, management, economics and more. The Carlson School also has several research centers focusing on topics such as sustainability or global supply chain management that provide students with valuable hands-on research opportunities outside the classroom setting.

The University of St Thomas’ Opus College of Business is another top-tier business school located in St Paul. Students can choose from an array of degrees including bachelor’s degrees in accounting and finance; master’s degrees in international business or operations and supply chain management; Ph.D.s in technology information systems; plus numerous certificates across various disciplines such as entrepreneurship & innovation or healthcare leadership & management. In addition to their academic offerings, Opus College has several research centers focusing on topics such as sustainability or global supply chain management that provide students with valuable hands-on research opportunities outside the classroom setting.

Another well-known business school located in Minneapolis is the University of Minnesota’s Humphrey School of Public Affairs which offers bachelor’s degrees in public affairs or policy analysis & evaluation; master’s degrees in public policy or nonprofit management; plus numerous certificates across various disciplines such as public financial administration or policy analysis & evaluation among others. In addition to its academic offerings, Humphrey School also has several research centers focusing on topics such as sustainability or global supply chain management that provide students with valuable hands-on research opportunities outside the classroom setting.

Finally, Concordia University St Paul offers an impressive selection of degree programs ranging from associate’s degrees through doctoral degrees with concentrations like finance & investments or human resource leadership & development among others. Concordia also provides several certificate programs tailored towards gaining specialized knowledge within certain fields like project management or financial analysis & planning among others.

In conclusion, there are many outstanding business schools located throughout Minnesota offering an array of undergraduate and graduate degree programs along with numerous certificate programs tailored towards gaining specialized knowledge or skills within certain fields like accounting or cybersecurity. Each school has its own unique advantages so it is important that potential students do their research before deciding on where they want to pursue their business degree.

  • The capital city of Minnesota is Saint Paul, which was established in 1849. With a land area of 52.8 mi2, Saint Paul has a total population of 308,096 according to timedictionary.

Best Business Schools in Minnesota

National Ranking Best Business MBA Programs
31 University of Minnesota–Twin Cities (Carlson) (Minneapolis, MN)
Acceptance rate: 40.9%
Average GMAT score: 686
Average undergraduate GPA: 3.30
Tuition: In-state, full-time: $31,706 per year; Out-of-state, full-time: $44,568 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 172
Average starting salary and bonus: $110,349
Full-time graduates employed at graduation: 63.2%University of Minnesota--Twin Cities Business School
131 University of St. Thomas (Minneapolis, MN)
Acceptance rate: 89.2%
Average GMAT score: 581
Average undergraduate GPA: 3.20
Tuition: Full-time: $28,000 per year
Enrollment (full-time): 90
Average starting salary and bonus: $60,657
Full-time graduates employed at graduation: 46.6%University of St. Thomas Business School

According to transporthint, Minnesota is a state located in the Midwestern United States. It is bordered by Wisconsin to the east, Iowa to the south and North Dakota and South Dakota to the west. It is the 12th most populous state in the United States with a population of approximately 5.6 million people as of 2020. The capital of Minnesota is Saint Paul and its largest city is Minneapolis. Minnesota was originally part of French Canada before it was ceded to Britain in 1763, and then became part of the United States in 1803 as part of the Louisiana Purchase. It became an official state on May 11, 1858 after being admitted into Union during the American Civil War. Minnesota is known as “The Land of 10,000 Lakes” due to its numerous freshwater lakes that span its landscape. Agriculture has been an important part of Minnesota’s economy for many years with dairy farming being one of its primary industries. Other important economic sectors include manufacturing, medical technology, tourism and timber production. Minnesota also has an extensive network of highways that stretch from border to border making it easy for people to travel throughout the state quickly and efficiently. In addition to its agricultural industry, Minnesota has become a popular tourist destination due to its beautiful landscapes along Lake Superior, numerous outdoor activities such as hiking and fishing and historical sites such as Fort Snelling State Park National Historic Site. There are also many cultural events taking place throughout Minnesota including festivals celebrating art, music, food and history.

Flag of Betsy Ross

On June 14, 1777, the Marine Committee of the Second Continental Congress passed a resolution stating:

“We decided that the flag of the United States would have thirteen alternating red and white stripes and thirteen stars, white on a blue field, representing the new constellation.”

The first President of the United States, George Washington, spoke about the US flag:

“We took the stars from heaven, red is the color of our homeland, the white stripes that separate it mean that we separated from it; these white stripes will go down in history as a symbol of freedom.”

There is no reliable information about who exactly was the author of the US flag. According to one version, the flag was proposed exactly as it was adopted by Francis Hopkinson, former chairman of the Maritime Committee of the Second Continental Congress and one of the authors of the US Declaration of Independence.

A widely circulated and very popular story in the US is that the first US flag was sewn by Betsy Ross, a dressmaker from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. According to legend, the first US President George Washington, financier George Ross and Colonel Robert Morris approached Betsy Ross with a proposal to sew the flag of the new state. During the discussion, Betsy suggested replacing the six-pointed stars (as originally planned) with five-pointed ones, her proposal was accepted.

The flag is believed to have been made by Betsy Ross for the United States Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776.

In 1795, following the entry of the states of Vermont and Kentucky into the US, the number of stars and stripes on the US flag was increased from thirteen to fifteen. This is exactly what, with fifteen stars and fifteen stripes, was the US flag that became famous as the “Star-Spangled Banner”, seen by the American poet Francis Key over Fort McHenry in 1814. Impressed by what he saw, Francis Key wrote the poem “The Defense of Fort McHenry”, which later became the text of the US anthem.

In 1818, the number of stripes on the US flag was reduced to the original thirteen, and subsequently only stars were added to the flag, according to the number of states in the country.

The fiftieth star was added to the US flag in 1960, when the last state of Hawaii entered the US today.

The US Army Institute of Heraldry has prepared proposals to redesign the US flag with a very possible future increase in the number of states.