Bangladesh Achievements

Bangladesh Achievements

Bangladesh Economy

Bangladesh Economy

Estimated gross domestic product: $ 286 billion (2019)

Per capita income (purchasing power parity): 4,561 USD (2018)

Human Development Rank (HDI): Rank 135 (of 189) (2018)

Proportion of poverty (national poverty line): 21.8% (2018, Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics)

Distribution of income (Gini coefficient): 39.5 (2018)

Economic Transformation Index (BTI): Rank 64 (of 129) (2018)

Cultivation of a spinach variety

Cultivation of a spinach variety

Economic indicators, analysis, statistics

Working as a rickshaw driver is a seasonal income for many, for which they temporarily move to a city

Working as a rickshaw driver is a seasonal income for many, for which they temporarily move to a city

Technical defects in the power grid lead to greater transmission loss.

Technical defects in the power grid lead to greater transmission loss.

Bangladesh has achieved since 1971:

  • a halving of income poverty.
  • in the field of primary education, an enrollment rate of almost 100%.
  • an equalization of the proportion of boys and girls who attend school.
  • Implementation of vaccination programs.
  • that child mortality and maternal mortality are falling.
  • a reduction in the decisive criteria, so that Bangladesh is now classified under the countries to which a medium human development is assigned. As a country located in southern Asia according to weddinginfashion, Bangladesh is currently ranked 136th.
  • a classification in the countries with a ‘lower middle income’ by the World Bank.
  • economic growth averaging 6.4% between 2012 and 2017

For some years now, the population of Bangladesh has been experiencing an increased conflict of distribution and opportunities due to population growth with simultaneously decreasing land resources and often a lack of alternatives to agricultural labor. The pressure is also increased by extreme weather events and other consequences that result, for example, from a certain variability in climatic conditions. The urban slums are growing, albeit at a somewhat slower pace than in other countries with similar work and economic structures. Likewise, people with a higher level of education compete for university places and better-paid jobs. An example of this were the protests, especially among students and university graduates in the metropolitan areas, especially in the capital Dhaka, at the end of 2018, which were’Quota Reform Movement’became known. They were directed against the system of reserving public jobs for former freedom fighters and their descendants. The civil service in Bangladesh represents a secure, comparatively well-paid income opportunity. Various factors, including those already mentioned above, encouraged the emergence of this movement. Furthermore, there is a general increase in the cost of living in cities and the supply of water and electricity in rural areas and smaller cities is often patchy or a connection to public supply networks has not yet been completed. The structures of the metropolitan areas are also temporarily stressed when seasonal workers move to the cities for some time and look for jobs and accommodation there. The necessary infrastructure is being expanded in many areas, but the pace of this expansion cannot yet keep up with the population dynamics. For example, this is currently the first nuclear power plant in the country under construction. According to the plan, it should go online in 2023. Also, another will be built, according to Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina. Electricity is also imported from India. Its rates, however, are sometimes very high and the network for distributing the imported electricity in Bangladesh is in parts ailing. Existing sections of the power grid must also be rehabilitated in the event of network loss due to poor electrical lines. Around 60% of all households are currently connected to the state network. Around another percent of all households are supplied with electricity via individual solar systems.

The standard of living differs greatly between rural and urban areas

The standard of living differs greatly between rural and urban areas