ACT Test Centers and Dates in Myanmar

By | March 17, 2019

Your search found 1 match. The following is the full list of ACT testing locations in Myanmar among which you can pick one to take the exam. Please know that on the test day, test takers can use any 4-function, scientific, or graphing calculator. On the table below, you can also find all test dates through 2019.

ACT Testing Locations in Myanmar

2019-2020 ACT Test Dates in Myanmar

Test Date Registration Deadline
February 9, 2019 January 11, 2019
April 13, 2019 March 8, 2019
June 8, 2019 May 3, 2019
July 13, 2019 June 14, 2019
September 14, 2019 August 16, 2019
October 26, 2019 September 20, 2019
December 14, 2019 November 8, 2019
February 8, 2020 January 10, 2020
April 4, 2020 February 28, 2020
June 13, 2020 May 8, 2020
July 18, 2020 June 19, 2020

ACT Test Centers in Myanmar

City Center Name Center Code
Yangon Crown Education 874000

ACT Test Centers and Dates in Myanmar

The golden roofs of Burma

“And then a golden miracle rose on the horizon, a shining, shining miracle that shone in the sun. It was neither in the shape of a Muslim dome nor that of a Hindu temple top. This is Burma, said my companion, and it will be like no other country you know. ‘These are the lines the English writer Rudyard Kipling wrote when he came to British Burma in 1889 on his world tour. With these words Kipling described the Shwedagon Pagoda, the most important Buddhist shrine of the Burmese and – if you will – their national feeling turned into stone. Whoever rules the pagoda rules the land too. That is why the British, like the present military government, endeavored to be regarded as the sponsors and protectors of the pagoda. Check ask4beauty to see Burma Myanmar.

The community of monks living in the Shwedagon is considered to be the highest moral authority in the country. Eight hairs of the Buddha are kept here, which he had torn out to thank merchants from Dagon, today’s Rangoon, for a present they had brought. Piety dictates that you approach the stupa barefoot, so shoes and stockings have to be taken off at the stairs. Four staircases, aligned with the cardinal points, lead to the hill, on which there is an almost square terrace. In the middle there is an octagonal temple building on which the circular golden roof rests, the top of which rises 98 meters. According to a popular saying, there is more gold on this pagoda than in the Bank of England. The stupa is surrounded by 64 smaller stupas. The Burmese are Buddhists, but this does not prevent them from still believing in spirits. 37 spirits, called nats, watch over places, people and areas of life. They are subordinate to the Buddha and are intended to help solve everyday problems, while Buddha’s laws point the future. In addition to the Buddha statues, there are always places in the stupas where the nats are venerated. A special place for the worship of the nats is in the now largely destroyed temple city of Pagan, the capital of Burma from the 11th to the 13th centuries. The 11th century Shwe-Zigon Paya stupa is still in use today and is the main center for worshiping the nats. The Nat King Thagyamin is shown as a figure in the stupa. They are subordinate to the Buddha and are intended to help solve everyday problems, while Buddha’s laws point the future. In addition to the Buddha statues, there are always places in the stupas where the nats are venerated. A special place for the worship of the nats is in the now largely destroyed temple city of Pagan, the capital of Burma from the 11th to the 13th centuries. The 11th century Shwe-Zigon Paya stupa is still in use today and is the main center for worshiping the nats. The Nat King Thagyamin is shown as a figure in the stupa. They are subordinate to the Buddha and are intended to help solve everyday problems, while Buddha’s laws point the future. In addition to the Buddha statues, there are always places in the stupas where the nats are venerated. A special place for the worship of the nats is in the now largely destroyed temple city of Pagan, the capital of Burma from the 11th to the 13th centuries. The 11th century Shwe-Zigon Paya stupa is still in use today and is the main center for worshiping the nats. The Nat King Thagyamin is shown as a figure in the stupa. A special place for the worship of the nats is in the now largely destroyed temple city of Pagan, the capital of Burma from the 11th to the 13th centuries. The 11th century Shwe-Zigon Paya stupa is still in use today and is the main center for worshiping the nats. The Nat King Thagyamin is shown as a figure in the stupa. A special place for the worship of the Nats is in the now largely destroyed temple city of Pagan, the capital of Burma from the 11th to 13th centuries. The 11th century stupa Shwe-Zigon Paya is still in use today and is the main center for worshiping the nats. The Nat King Thagyamin is shown as a figure in the stupa.

In Pegu, the former capital of a Lower Burmese kingdom, there is the Shwe Mawdaw Pagoda from the 9th century. Its roof rises 114 meters high and is thus higher than that of the Shwedagon Pagoda in Rangoon. The peak at the top is set with diamonds. Around 994, the figure of the Buddha Shwe-Thalyaung, who is about 55 meters long and who is going into nirvana, was created. Burma’s most unusual pagoda, the Kyaiktiyo, is located in the mountain jungle near Pegu. The “Balancing Pagoda on the Golden Rock” is a golden stupa, only 7 meters high and studded with precious stones, on a gold-covered boulder, right on the edge of a precipice. The legend reports that the rock only lasts because a hair of the Buddha is kept in the stupa. Allegedly the King of the Nats helped get the rock for the stupa.

Religious freedom is constitutionally protected. The largest religious community with a traditionally special position is Buddhism. It was the state religion in 1961/62, and from 1988 onwards, as »our national religion«, it once again received diverse state funding as a factor in building identity. Mostly in the form of the Theravada school (also Mahayana Buddhism in the northeast of the country), around 88% of the population profess the teachings of Siddhartha Gautama (Buddha). The 180,000 or so ordained monks and 20,000 nuns fulfill not only religious functions but also educational tasks.

Religious minorities are the Christians (approx. 6%), Muslims (4%) and Hindus, as well as the followers of indigenous religions and forms of Trantistic religiosity. The worship of deities of popular belief (Nat cult) is also widespread among Buddhists. The majority of Christians (6%) belong to Protestant denominations, especially Baptists; the Anglicans are administratively subordinate to the Anglican Church of the Province of Myanmar (seat of the Archbishop: Rangoon). There are three archdioceses for Catholics: Mandalay, Rangoon and Taunggyi. The Muslims, who mainly live in the Rakhine State, Rangoon, Mandalay and other large cities, are Sunnis and predominantly of Indian origin. The Rohingya in particular belong to the Muslims.